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PROPOSITION 200

OFFICIAL TITLE

AN INITIATIVE MEASURE

AMENDING TITLE 5, CHAPTER 6, ARIZONA REVISED STATUTES BY ADDING NEW SECTIONS 5-601.02, 5-601.03, 5-601.04, 5-601.05 AND 5-601.06; AMENDING TITLE 13, CHAPTER 33, ARIZONA REVISED STATUTES BY ADDING SECTION 13-3302.01; RELATING TO INDIAN GAMING.

TEXT OF THE PROPOSED AMENDMENT

Be it enacted by the People of the State of Arizona:

SECTION 1. Title.

THIS MEASURE SHALL BE KNOWN AND MAY BE CITED AS THE "TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT, COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIP AND ELDERLY CARE ACT OF 2002."

SECTION 2. Findings and Declarations.

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF ARIZONA HEREBY FIND AND DECLARE ALL OF THE FOLLOWING:

(a) SINCE 1993, THE STATE OF ARIZONA HAS ENTERED INTO GAMING COMPACTS WITH 17 OF ARIZONA'S INDIAN TRIBES TO ALLOW GAMING ON TRIBAL LANDS.

(b) GAMING ALLOWED UNDER THE COMPACTS HAS PRODUCED SIGNIFICANT ECONOMIC BENEFITS FOR ALL ARIZONANS AND HAS ENHANCED SELF-SUFFICIENCY AMONG ARIZONA'S INDIAN TRIBES.

(c) DESPITE THESE IMPORTANT GAINS, MANY OF ARIZONA'S INDIAN TRIBES FACE CONTINUING NEEDS AS UNEMPLOYMENT ON RESERVATIONS REMAINS HIGH AND THOUSANDS OF TRIBAL MEMBERS REMAIN IMPOVERISHED.

(d) IN ORDER TO ALLEVIATE POVERTY AND FURTHER PROMOTE SELF-SUFFICIENCY AMONG ARIZONA'S INDIAN TRIBES, NEW TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACTS ARE NEEDED THAT ESTABLISH POLICIES AND STANDARDS FOR THE CONDUCT OF GAMING ON INDIAN RESERVATIONS.

(e) AS PART OF NEW TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACTS, ARIZONA'S INDIAN TRIBES ARE WILLING TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE WELFARE OF BOTH YOUNG AND ELDERLY ARIZONANS BY DONATING A PORTION OF GAMING REVENUES TO THE ARIZONA COLLEGE EDUCATION SCHOLARSHIP AND ELDERLY CARE FUND. THIS FUND WILL PAY FOR COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS FOR ARIZONA STUDENTS TO ATTEND ARIZONA UNIVERSITIES, COMMUNITY AND TRIBAL COLLEGES, FUND PROGRAMS FOR SENIOR CITIZENS THROUGHOUT ARIZONA, AND FUND GENERAL EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS ON INDIAN RESERVATIONS.

(f) THE STATE SHOULD MONITOR GAMING ON INDIAN RESERVATIONS AND THE COST FOR SUCH MONITORING SHOULD BE PAID FROM GAMING REVENUES.

SECTION 3. Purpose and Intent.

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF ARIZONA HEREBY DECLARE THEIR PURPOSE AND INTENT IN ENACTING THE MEASURE TO BE AS FOLLOWS:

(a) TO CONTINUE TO PERMIT GAMING ONLY ON INDIAN RESERVATIONS.

(b) TO PRODUCE SIGNIFICANT ECONOMIC BENEFITS FOR ALL ARIZONANS AND ENHANCE SELF-SUFFICIENCY AMONG ARIZONA'S INDIAN TRIBES.

(c) TO MEET THE CONTINUING NEEDS OF ARIZONA'S INDIAN TRIBES AS UNEMPLOYMENT ON THE RESERVATIONS REMAINS HIGH AND THOUSANDS OF TRIBAL MEMBERS REMAIN IMPOVERISHED.

(d) TO REQUIRE THAT THE STATE OF ARIZONA ENTER INTO COMPACTS FOR THE CONDUCT OF GAMING ON INDIAN RESERVATIONS IN ORDER TO ALLEVIATE POVERTY AND FURTHER PROMOTE SELF-SUFFICIENCY.

(e) TO ALLOW ARIZONA'S INDIAN TRIBES THE ABILITY TO CONTRIBUTE A PORTION OF GAMING REVENUES TO FUND COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS FOR ARIZONA RESIDENTS AND PROVIDE ADDITIONAL RESOURCES FOR ELDERLY CARE.

(f) TO MONITOR GAMING ON INDIAN RESERVATIONS AT NO COST TO THE ARIZONA TAXPAYERS.

SECTION 4. Title 5, Chapter 6, Article 1, Arizona Revised Statutes, is amended by adding Section 5-601.02 to read:

5-601.02. TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACTS; POLICIES AND STANDARDS; AMENDMENTS TO EXISTING GAMING COMPACTS; LIMITATIONS ON GAMING DEVICES AND TABLES; ESTABLISHMENT OF THE ARIZONA COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIP AND ELDERLY CARE FUND; ESTABLISHMENT OF TRIBAL-STATE COMPACT FUND; FUND EXPENDITURES; CONDITIONS FOR REPEAL OF COMPACT PROVISIONS; INTER-TRIBAL TRANSFER OF GAMING DEVICES; DEFINITIONS .

A. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER PROVISION OF LAW, THE GOVERNOR, ON BEHALF OF THE STATE OF ARIZONA, SHALL ENTER INTO A TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION WITH EACH INDIAN TRIBE THAT REQUESTS SUCH A COMPACT. UPON RECEIPT OF A REQUEST FROM AN INDIAN TRIBE, THE GOVERNOR SHALL WITHIN NINETY DAYS ENTER INTO A TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT WITH THE REQUESTING INDIAN TRIBE.

B. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER PROVISION OF LAW, ANY TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT THAT IS EXECUTED, AMENDED OR RENEWED PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION SHALL REFLECT THE FOLLOWING POLICIES AND STANDARDS FOR THE CONDUCT OF GAMING ON INDIAN RESERVATIONS AND SHALL CONTAIN THE FOLLOWING TERMS:

(1) TERM OF GAMING COMPACT. THE TERM OF THE TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT SHALL BE FOR TWENTY YEARS. A TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT SHALL BE EXTENDED FOR ADDITIONAL TWENTY-YEAR TERMS AT ANY TIME BEFORE THE EXPIRATION OF THE TERM OF THE TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT THEN IN EXISTENCE UPON THE REQUEST OF AN INDIAN TRIBE.

(2) AUTHORIZED GAMING. AN INDIAN TRIBE SHALL BE AUTHORIZED TO CONDUCT GAMING AT THREE GAMING FACILITIES, AND SUCH ADDITIONAL GAMING FACILITIES AS SHALL BE AGREED UPON BY THE GOVERNOR AND EACH INDIAN TRIBE. FOR PURPOSES OF THIS SECTION, GAMING SHALL INCLUDE ALL FORMS OF CLASS I, CLASS II, AND CLASS III GAMING AS DEFINED IN 25 UNITED STATES CODE SECTION 2703, PARAGRAPHS (6), (7) AND (8) IN EFFECT AS OF THE EFFECTIVE DATE OF THIS ACT, IT BEING UNDERSTOOD THAT THE STATE OF ARIZONA SHALL NOT HAVE ANY AUTHORITY OR JURISDICTION OVER OR POWER TO REGULATE OR MONITOR CLASS I OR CLASS II GAMING THAT TAKES PLACE ON ANY INDIAN RESERVATION.

(3) FORMS OF PAYMENT. ALL PAYMENT FOR WAGERS MADE ON AUTHORIZED FORMS OF GAMING CONDUCTED BY AN INDIAN TRIBE, INCLUDING THE PURCHASE OF TOKENS FOR USE IN WAGERING, SHALL BE MADE BY CASH, CASH EQUIVALENT, CREDIT CARD OR PERSONAL CHECK. PERSONAL CHECKS SHALL NOT BE HONORED IN EXCESS OF ONE THOUSAND DOLLARS PER PERSON PER DAY. AUTOMATIC TELLER MACHINES MAY BE INSTALLED AT THE GAMING FACILITIES. PERSONAL CHECKS GUARANTEED BY A THIRD PARTY CHECK GUARANTEE COMPANY SHALL BE CONSIDERED AUTOMATIC TELLER MACHINE TRANSACTIONS.

(4) WAGERING LIMITATIONS. THE MAXIMUM WAGER AUTHORIZED FOR ANY SINGLE PLAY OF A GAMING DEVICE IS TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS. THE MAXIMUM WAGER FOR ANY SINGLE PLAY AT ANY TABLE GAME SHALL BE DETERMINED THROUGH NEGOTIATIONS BETWEEN THE GOVERNOR AND EACH INDIAN TRIBE WITH THE OBJECTIVE OF AGREEING ON WAGERING LIMITATIONS CONSISTENT WITH GAMING INDUSTRY PRACTICE LIMITATIONS. ALL WAGERING LIMITATIONS ESTABLISHED PURSUANT TO THIS PARAGRAPH SHALL BE INCREASED IN AN AMOUNT EQUAL TO THE ANNUAL INCREASE IN THE CONSUMER PRICE INDEX. IN THIS PARAGRAPH, "CONSUMER PRICE INDEX" MEANS THE CONSUMER PRICE INDEX FOR ALL URBAN CONSUMERS, UNITED STATES CITY AVERAGE, THAT IS PUBLISHED BY THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR, BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

(5) HOURS OF OPERATION. AN INDIAN TRIBE MAY ESTABLISH BY ORDINANCE OR REGULATION THE PERMISSIBLE HOURS AND DAYS OF OPERATION OF GAMING ACTIVITIES, PROVIDED, HOWEVER, THAT THE INDIAN TRIBE SHALL COMPLY WITH ALL APPLICABLE STATE LIQUOR LAWS AT ALL GAMING FACILITIES.

(6) OWNERSHIP OF THE GAMING FACILITIES AND GAMING ACTIVITIES. INDIAN TRIBES SHALL HAVE THE SOLE PROPRIETARY INTEREST IN AND RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE CONDUCT OF ANY GAMING ACTIVITIES. NOTHING IN THIS PROVISION SHALL BE CONSTRUED TO PREVENT AN INDIAN TRIBE FROM GRANTING SECURITY INTEREST OR OTHER FINANCIAL ACCOMMODATIONS TO SECURED PARTIES, LENDERS OR OTHERS, OR TO PREVENT AN INDIAN TRIBE FROM ENTERING INTO TRUE LEASES OR FINANCING LEASE ARRANGEMENTS OR TO HIRE OR RETAIN AN OPERATOR, MANAGER OR MANAGEMENT COMPANY TO OPERATE OR MANAGE THE GAMING FACILITY.

(7) RESTRICTIONS ON MINORS. UNLESS OTHERWISE PERMITTED UNDER STATE LAW, NO PERSON UNDER TWENTY-ONE YEARS OF AGE SHALL BE PERMITTED TO PLACE ANY WAGER, DIRECTLY OR INDIRECTLY, AS PART OF ANY GAMING ACTIVITY CONDUCTED AT A GAMING FACILITY OR BE EMPLOYED IN THE SERVICE OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES AT ANY GAMING FACILITY.

(8) RECORD KEEPING. THE GAMING FACILITY OPERATOR SHALL MAINTAIN A SURVEILLANCE LOG RECORDING ALL MATERIAL SURVEILLANCE ACTIVITIES IN THE SURVEILLANCE ROOM OF THE GAMING FACILITIES, WHICH LOG SHALL BE AVAILABLE FOR INSPECTION BY THE DEPARTMENT ON NOT LESS THAN TWENTY-FOUR HOURS NOTICE TO THE INDIAN TRIBE.

(9) OPERATION AS PART OF A NETWORK. GAMING DEVICES AUTHORIZED PURSUANT TO A TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT MAY BE OPERATED TO OFFER AN AGGREGATE PRIZE OR PRIZES AS PART OF A NETWORK WITH THE GAMING DEVICES OF OTHER INDIAN TRIBES LOCATED WITHIN THE STATE THAT HAVE ENTERED INTO GAMING COMPACTS WITH THE STATE.

(10) GAMING CONTRIBUTION. EACH INDIAN TRIBE ENTERING INTO A TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION SHALL ANNUALLY CONTRIBUTE TO THE STATE AN AMOUNT EQUAL TO THREE PER CENT OF EACH INDIAN TRIBE'S ANNUAL NET INCOME AS DEFINED IN SUBSECTION M, PARAGRAPH 1 OF THIS SECTION FOR DEPOSIT IN THE ARIZONA COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIP AND ELDERLY CARE FUND ESTABLISHED IN SUBSECTION H OF THIS SECTION. THE STATE TREASURER SHALL ADMINISTER THE FUND. THE DEPARTMENT SHALL KEEP THE AMOUNT OF THE ANNUAL CONTRIBUTION MADE PURSUANT TO THIS PARAGRAPH BY EACH INDIAN TRIBE CONFIDENTIAL, BUT MAY MAKE PUBLIC THE AMOUNT OF THE TOTAL ANNUAL CONTRIBUTION MADE PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION BY ALL OF THE GAMING INDIAN TRIBES.

(11) GAMING COMPACT MONITORING COSTS. EACH INDIAN TRIBE ENTERING INTO A TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION SHALL PAY AN ANNUAL FEE OF FIVE HUNDRED DOLLARS PER OPERATING GAMING DEVICE TO THE ARIZONA STATE TREASURER FOR DEPOSIT INTO THE TRIBAL-STATE COMPACT FUND ESTABLISHED IN SUBSECTION J OF THIS SECTION. THE STATE SHALL NOT IMPOSE ANY OTHER FEES OR ASSESSMENTS ON AN INDIAN TRIBE, EXCEPT AS PROVIDED IN THIS SUBSECTION.

(12) RESTRICTION ON FIREARMS. ANY INDIAN TRIBE MAY RESTRICT THE POSSESSION OF A FIREARM WITHIN A GAMING FACILITY. THE RESTRICTION SHALL NOT APPLY TO CERTIFIED LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS AUTHORIZED BY AN INDIAN TRIBE TO BE ON THE PREMISES AS WELL AS ANY PRIVATE SECURITY SERVICE RETAINED TO PROVIDE SECURITY AT A GAMING FACILITY OR ARMORED CAR SERVICES.

(13) INVESTIGATION AND REPORTING OF VIOLATIONS. EACH INDIAN TRIBE SHALL INVESTIGATE ANY REPORTED VIOLATION OF THE TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT ENTERED INTO PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION OR ANY TRIBAL GAMING ORDINANCE AND SHALL REQUIRE THE GAMING FACILITY OPERATOR TO CORRECT THE VIOLATION UPON SUCH TERMS AND CONDITIONS AS THE INDIAN TRIBE DETERMINES ARE NECESSARY AND PROPER UNDER THE PROVISIONS OF THE TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT OR THE INDIAN TRIBE'S GAMING ORDINANCE. WITHIN FORTY-EIGHT HOURS OF THE TIME A VIOLATION OR SUSPECTED VIOLATION OF A TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT OR OF A TRIBAL GAMING ORDINANCE IS REPORTED, AN INDIAN TRIBE SHALL NOTIFY THE DEPARTMENT. AN INDIAN TRIBE SHALL PROVIDE COPIES OF ITS INVESTIGATIVE REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT, IF THE DISCLOSURE OF THE REPORT WILL NOT COMPROMISE ANY CONTINUING LAW ENFORCEMENT INVESTIGATION.

(14) PROCEDURES FOR EMPLOYMENT OF ENROLLED MEMBERS OF AN INDIAN TRIBE BY THAT INDIAN TRIBE'S GAMING FACILITY OPERATOR. THE GAMING FACILITY OPERATOR OF AN INDIAN TRIBE'S GAMING FACILITY SHALL BE FREE TO EMPLOY ENROLLED TRIBAL MEMBERS OF THAT INDIAN TRIBE IN ITS GAMING FACILITIES PURSUANT TO SUCH RULES AND REGULATIONS ESTABLISHED BY THAT INDIAN TRIBE, IT BEING UNDERSTOOD THAT THE STATE SHALL HAVE NO AUTHORITY OR ROLE IN THE APPROVAL OF ENROLLED TRIBAL MEMBERS EMPLOYED BY THAT INDIAN TRIBE'S GAMING FACILITY OPERATOR.

(15) PROCEDURES FOR NON-ENROLLED TRIBAL MEMBER LICENSING, STATE CERTIFICATION AND STATE CERTIFICATION RENEWAL. EVERY NON-ENROLLED TRIBAL MEMBER APPLICANT FOR A CLASS III TRIBAL GAMING LICENSE AND EVERY NON-ENROLLED TRIBAL MEMBER APPLICANT FOR STATE CERTIFICATION AND RENEWAL OF STATE CERTIFICATION SHALL SUBMIT THE COMPLETED APPLICATION, ALONG WITH ANY OTHER REQUIRED INFORMATION, TO BOTH THE INDIAN TRIBE AND TO THE DEPARTMENT. EACH NON-ENROLLED TRIBAL MEMBER APPLICATION FOR STATE CERTIFICATION AND FOR A CLASS III TRIBAL GAMING LICENSE SHALL BE ACCOMPANIED BY THE APPLICANT'S FINGERPRINT CARD OR CARDS AND A CURRENT PHOTOGRAPH. THE DEPARTMENT SHALL APPROVE OR DENY EACH NON-ENROLLED TRIBAL MEMBER APPLICATION FOR STATE CERTIFICATION OR RENEWAL OF STATE CERTIFICATION WITHIN TEN DAYS OF RECEIPT OF SUCH AN APPLICATION. THE DEPARTMENT SHALL NOT DENY AN APPLICATION OF A NON-ENROLLED TRIBAL MEMBER FOR STATE CERTIFICATION OR RENEWAL OF STATE CERTIFICATION UNLESS SUCH DENIAL IS SOLELY BASED UPON SPECIFIC TERMS AGREED TO BY THE STATE AND EACH INDIAN TRIBE THAT HAS ENTERED INTO A TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION. ALL OF THE COSTS INCURRED BY THE DEPARTMENT TO COMPLY WITH THIS SECTION SHALL BE PAID FROM THE TRIBAL-STATE COMPACT FUND ESTABLISHED PURSUANT TO SUBSECTION J OF THIS SECTION. THE DEPARTMENT SHALL NOT CHARGE A FEE FOR THE RENEWAL OF STATE CERTIFICATION. THE COST OF BACKGROUND CHECKS TO COMPLY WITH THIS PARAGRAPH SHALL NOT EXCEED THE COMMERCIAL RATE CHARGED FOR SUCH SERVICES AS DETERMINED BY THE STATE AUDITOR GENERAL. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER PROVISION OF LAW, THE STATE SHALL ONLY HAVE THE AUTHORITY TO CERTIFY NON-ENROLLED TRIBAL MEMBERS WHO ARE GAMING EMPLOYEES AS DEFINED IN SUBSECTION M PARAGRAPH 6 OF THIS SECTION TO THE EXTENT THE GAMING EMPLOYEES ARE ENGAGED IN CLASS III GAMING ACTIVITIES.

(16) APPENDIXES. EXCEPT AS OTHERWISE AGREED UPON BY THE GOVERNOR AND EACH INDIAN TRIBE, EACH TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT ENTERED INTO PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION SHALL CONTAIN THE SAME APPENDIX PROVISIONS RELATING TO THE DEFINITIONS, OPERATIONAL STANDARDS, SPECIFICATIONS AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING KENO, THE TECHNICAL STANDARDS FOR ELECTRONIC GAMES OF CHANCE AND THE SECURITY AND SURVEILLANCE REQUIREMENTS AS CONTAINED IN THAT INDIAN TRIBE'S GAMING COMPACT IN EFFECT AS OF JANUARY 1, 2002. IN THE EVENT THAT AN INDIAN TRIBE DOES NOT HAVE A TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT AS OF JANUARY 1, 2002, THE GOVERNOR AND THAT INDIAN TRIBE SHALL NEGOTIATE IN GOOD FAITH TO AGREE ON APPENDIX PROVISIONS SIMILAR TO THOSE IN EFFECT IN TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACTS AS OF JANUARY 1, 2002. EACH INDIAN TRIBE ENTERING INTO A TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION SHALL BE AUTHORIZED TO OPERATE KENO GAMES AT TWO LOCATIONS AND SUCH ADDITIONAL NUMBER OF KENO GAMES AS THE GOVERNOR AND EACH INDIAN TRIBE MAY AGREE UPON. IN THE EVENT OF A CONFLICT BETWEEN ANY PROVISION OF THE APPENDIXES AND ANY PROVISION OF THIS SECTION, THE SPECIFIC LANGUAGE OF THIS SECTION SHALL CONTROL.

(17) ARBITRATION. EACH TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT ENTERED INTO PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION SHALL CONTAIN ALL OF THE PROVISIONS FOR ARBITRATION ESTABLISHED IN � 5-601.05.

(18) LIMITATION ON EXPANSION OF GAMING. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER PROVISION OF LAW, IF GAMING DEVICES OR TABLE GAMES THAT WOULD OTHERWISE QUALIFY AS CLASS III GAMING PURSUANT TO 25 UNITED STATES CODE SECTION 2703 IN EFFECT AS OF THE EFFECTIVE DATE OF THIS ACT ARE AUTHORIZED BY LAW TO BE CONDUCTED FOR PROFIT OTHER THAN ON AN INDIAN RESERVATION LOCATED WITHIN THE STATE OR IF ANY ADDITIONAL FEES, TAXES OR ASSESSMENTS NOT AUTHORIZED PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION OR SECTION 5-601.03, 5-601.04, 5-601.05 OR 5-601.06 ARE IMPOSED ON AN INDIAN TRIBE RELATING TO GAMING CONDUCTED PURSUANT TO A TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT ENTERED INTO PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION, BOTH OF THE FOLLOWING SHALL OCCUR: (1) SUBSECTION B PARAGRAPHS 10 AND 11 OF THIS SECTION SHALL BECOME NULL AND VOID AND NO INDIAN TRIBE ENTERING INTO A TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION SHALL BE REQUIRED TO PAY ANY FEES, ASSESSMENTS OR CONTRIBUTIONS RELATED TO GAMING TO THE STATE; AND (2) SUBSECTIONS E AND F OF THIS SECTION SHALL BECOME NULL AND VOID AND THERE SHALL BE NO LIMITATIONS ON THE NUMBER OF GAMING DEVICES OR TABLE GAMES THAT AN INDIAN TRIBE IS AUTHORIZED TO OPERATE IN THIS STATE. NOTHING IN THIS SUBSECTION IS INTENDED TO RESTRICT OR LIMIT THE USE OF GAMING DEVICES AND TABLE GAMES FOR CHARITY FUNDRAISING.

(19) OTHER GAMING COMPACT TERMS. EXCEPT FOR THE TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT TERMS SET FORTH IN SUBSECTION B PARAGRAPHS ONE THROUGH EIGHTEEN OF THIS SECTION, THE GOVERNOR, ON BEHALF OF THE STATE, AND AN INDIAN TRIBE MAY MUTUALLY AGREE UPON SUCH OTHER TERMS TO BE INCLUDED IN THAT INDIAN TRIBE'S TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT AS THE STATE AND EACH INDIAN TRIBE DEEM APPROPRIATE. AFTER THE GOVERNOR, ON BEHALF OF THE STATE, AND AN INDIAN TRIBE HAVE SIGNED A TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION, THE GOVERNOR, ON BEHALF OF THE STATE, AND AN INDIAN TRIBE MAY MUTUALLY AGREE TO AMEND THE TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT TERMS CONTAINED IN SUBSECTION B PARAGRAPHS ONE THROUGH EIGHTEEN OF THIS SECTION.

C. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER PROVISION OF LAW, ANY TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT BETWEEN AN INDIAN TRIBE AND THE STATE IN EXISTENCE AS OF JANUARY 1, 2003 SHALL BE AMENDED TO CONFORM TO THE PROVISIONS OF THIS SECTION UPON THE WRITTEN REQUEST OF AN INDIAN TRIBE.

D. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER PROVISION OF LAW, THE PROVISIONS OF SECTION 5-601 AND SECTION 5-601.01 SHALL NOT APPLY TO ANY TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT AMENDED CONSISTENT WITH THIS SECTION OR ENTERED INTO BY AN INDIAN TRIBE PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION.

E. EACH INDIAN TRIBE ENTERING INTO A TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION SHALL BE AUTHORIZED TO OPERATE ONE THOUSAND GAMING DEVICES OR THE NUMBER OF GAMING DEVICES THAT AN INDIAN TRIBE IS OPERATING ON THE EFFECTIVE DATE OF THIS ACT, WHICHEVER IS GREATER, PLUS THAT NUMBER OF GAMING DEVICES OBTAINED BY TRANSFER PURSUANT TO SUBSECTION G OF THIS SECTION. THE MAXIMUM NUMBER OF GAMING DEVICES AUTHORIZED PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION SHALL ANNUALLY INCREASE BY THE ANNUAL PERCENTAGE INCREASE IN THE STATEWIDE POPULATION AS ESTIMATED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC SECURITY OR ITS SUCCESSOR AGENCY AS OF JULY 1 FOR EACH CALENDAR YEAR BEGINNING ON JANUARY 1, 2005 AND EVERY YEAR THEREAFTER. FOR PURPOSES OF THIS SUBSECTION, GAMING DEVICES OBTAINED BY TRANSFER, LICENSE OR LEASE PURSUANT TO SUBSECTION G OF THIS SECTION SHALL NOT BE CONSIDERED IN CALCULATING THE PERCENTAGE INCREASE IN GAMING DEVICES AUTHORIZED PURSUANT TO THIS SUBSECTION.

F. EACH INDIAN TRIBE ENTERING INTO A TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION SHALL BE AUTHORIZED TO OPERATE IN EACH GAMING FACILITY TWENTY TABLES AT WHICH TABLE GAMES MAY BE CONDUCTED.

G. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER PROVISION OF LAW, UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2007 EACH INDIAN TRIBE THAT HAS NOT ENTERED INTO A TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT PURSUANT TO � 5-601 OR � 5-601.01 ON THE EFFECTIVE DATE OF THIS ACT OR THAT ENTERED INTO A TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT PURSUANT TO � 5-601 OR � 5-601.01 BUT IS NOT OPERATING A GAMING FACILITY ON THE EFFECTIVE DATE OF THIS ACT AND WHO ENTERS INTO A TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION SHALL BE AUTHORIZED TO TRANSFER, LICENSE OR LEASE SOME OR ALL OF THE ALLOTMENT OF GAMING DEVICES THAT ARE AUTHORIZED PURSUANT TO THAT INDIAN TRIBE'S TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT TO ANOTHER INDIAN TRIBE THAT HAS ENTERED INTO A TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION ON SUCH TERMS AND CONDITIONS AS THE CONTRACTING INDIAN TRIBES MAY AGREE. BEGINNING ON JANUARY 1, 2008, EACH INDIAN TRIBE ENTERING INTO A TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION SHALL BE AUTHORIZED TO TRANSFER, LICENSE OR LEASE SOME OR ALL OF THE ALLOTMENT OF GAMING DEVICES THAT ARE AUTHORIZED PURSUANT TO THAT INDIAN TRIBE'S TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT TO ANOTHER INDIAN TRIBE THAT HAS ENTERED INTO A TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION ON SUCH TERMS AND CONDITIONS AS THE CONTRACTING INDIAN TRIBES MAY AGREE.

H. THE ARIZONA COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIP AND ELDERLY CARE FUND IS ESTABLISHED CONSISTING OF MONIES RECEIVED PURSUANT TO SUBSECTION B, PARAGRAPH 10 OF THIS SECTION AND MONIES RECEIVED AS DONATIONS. THE MONIES IN THE ARIZONA COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIP AND ELDERLY CARE FUND SHALL ANNUALLY BE EXPENDED ONLY FOR THE FOLLOWING PURPOSES:

(1) SEVENTY-FIVE PER CENT OF THE MONIES SHALL BE DISTRIBUTED TO UNIVERSITIES, COMMUNITY COLLEGES AND TRIBAL COLLEGES FOR SCHOLARSHIPS PURSUANT TO � 5-601.04 BY THE STATE TREASURER UPON RECEIPT OF NOTIFICATION FROM THE ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION PURSUANT TO � 5-601.04(E);

(2) ONE PER CENT OF THE MONIES, UP TO A MAXIMUM OF TWO HUNDRED THOUSAND DOLLARS IN EACH YEAR, SHALL BE DISTRIBUTED TO THE ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR REIMBURSEMENT OF EXPENSES INCURRED FOR COMPLIANCE WITH THE PROVISIONS OF � 5-601.04;

(3) FIVE PER CENT OF THE MONIES SHALL BE ANNUALLY TRANSFERRED ON THE FIRST BUSINESS DAY OF EACH JANUARY BEGINNING IN JANUARY 2004 TO THE ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR DISTRIBUTION IN EQUAL SHARES TO EACH INDIAN TRIBE TO BE EXCLUSIVELY USED FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES, AND THE ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SHALL NOT IMPOSE ANY CONDITIONS ON THE INDIAN TRIBE'S RECEIPT OR USE OF THE MONIES DISTRIBUTED PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION;

(4) FOURTEEN PER CENT OF THE MONIES SHALL BE ANNUALLY TRANSFERRED ON THE FIRST BUSINESS DAY OF EACH JANUARY BEGINNING IN JANUARY 2004 TO THE ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SERVICES FOR PROGRAMS THROUGHOUT THE STATE THAT BENEFIT SENIOR CITIZENS;

(5) FIVE PER CENT OF THE MONIES SHALL BE ANNUALLY TRANSFERRED ON THE FIRST BUSINESS DAY OF EACH JANUARY BEGINNING IN JANUARY 2004 TO THE ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SERVICES FOR DISTRIBUTION IN EQUAL SHARES TO EACH INDIAN TRIBE TO BE EXCLUSIVELY USED FOR ELDERLY HEALTH CARE SERVICES, AND THE ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SERVICES SHALL NOT IMPOSE ANY CONDITIONS ON THE INDIAN TRIBE'S OR USE RECEIPT OF THE MONIES DISTRIBUTED PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION.

I. MONIES DEPOSITED IN THE ARIZONA COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIP AND ELDERLY CARE FUND ESTABLISHED IN SUBSECTION H OF THIS SECTION ARE NOT SUBJECT TO LEGISLATIVE APPROPRIATION AND ARE CONTINUOUSLY APPROPRIATED AND EXEMPT FROM THE PROVISIONS OF SECTION 35-190 RELATING TO LAPSING OF APPROPRIATIONS.

J. A TRIBAL-STATE COMPACT FUND IS ESTABLISHED CONSISTING OF MONIES RECEIVED PURSUANT TO SUBSECTION B PARAGRAPH 11 OF THIS SECTION. THE STATE TREASURER SHALL ADMINISTER THE FUND. THE DIRECTOR OF THE DEPARTMENT OF GAMING SHALL MAKE AN ANNUAL REPORT TO THE GOVERNOR, THE PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE, THE SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES AND EACH INDIAN TRIBE THAT HAS EXECUTED A TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT WITH THE STATE DISCLOSING IN DETAIL THE ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT INCLUDING A FULL AND COMPLETE STATEMENT OF REVENUES DEPOSITED IN AND EXPENDITURES FROM THE TRIBAL-STATE COMPACT FUND. MONIES IN THE TRIBAL-STATE COMPACT FUND SHALL ONLY BE USED: (1) FOR THE PURPOSES ESTABLISHED IN SUBSECTION B, PARAGRAPH 15 OF THIS SECTION; (2) FOR REIMBURSEMENT OF ADMINISTRATIVE AND MONITORING EXPENSES INCURRED BY THE DEPARTMENT PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION; AND (3) FOR EXPENSES INCURRED BY THE COMMISSION ON INDIAN GAMING DISPUTES PURSUANT TO � 5-601.05 AND � 5-601.06. NO MONIES FROM THE TRIBAL-STATE COMPACT FUND SHALL BE USED TO PAY THE COSTS OF LITIGATION OR ARBITRATION INCURRED BY THE DEPARTMENT UNDER THE PROVISIONS OF THIS CHAPTER. IF ANY MONIES REMAIN IN THE TRIBAL-STATE COMPACT FUND AFTER EXPENDITURES PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION AT THE END OF EACH FISCAL YEAR, THE STATE TREASURER SHALL DISTRIBUTE THE REMAINING MONIES TO INDIAN TRIBES ENTERING INTO A TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT IN AN AMOUNT PROPORTIONATE TO EACH INDIAN TRIBE'S ANNUAL PAYMENT TO THE TRIBAL-STATE COMPACT FUND.

K. MONIES DEPOSITED IN THE TRIBAL-STATE COMPACT FUND ARE SUBJECT TO LEGISLATIVE APPROPRIATION. MONIES IN THE FUND ARE EXEMPT FROM THE PROVISIONS OF � 35-190 RELATING TO THE PROVISIONS ON LAPSING OF APPROPRIATIONS.

L. NOTHING IN THIS SECTION SHALL CREATE OR GIVE RISE TO A PRIVATE CAUSE OF ACTION TO ANY PERSON FOR ANY ACTION OR INACTION PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION TAKEN OR NOT TAKEN BY AN INDIAN TRIBE.

M. IN THIS SECTION AND SECTIONS 5-601.03, 5-601.04, 5-601.05 AND 5-601.06, UNLESS THE CONTEXT OTHERWISE REQUIRES:

(1) "ANNUAL NET INCOME" MEANS THE ANNUAL TOTAL AMOUNT OF MONEY COLLECTED FROM CLASS III GAMING, LESS ANY ANNUAL AMOUNTS PAID OUT AS PRIZES OR PAID FOR PRIZES AWARDED AND ANNUAL LABOR AND OTHER OPERATING EXPENSES AND ANNUAL INTEREST EXPENSES, DEPRECIATION AND AMORTIZATION.

(2) "DEPARTMENT" MEANS THE ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF GAMING.

(3) "ENROLLED TRIBAL MEMBER" MEANS A PERSON WHO IS ENROLLED IN THE INDIAN TRIBE, WHOSE NAME APPEARS IN THE TRIBAL MEMBERSHIP ROLL AND WHO MEETS THE WRITTEN CRITERIA FOR MEMBERSHIP.

(4) "GAMING ACTIVITY" MEANS ALL FORMS OF CLASS I, CLASS II OR CLASS III GAMING CONDUCTED AT A GAMING FACILITY.

(5) "GAMING DEVICE" MEANS A MECHANICAL, ELECTROMECHANICAL ELECTRONIC, MICROPROCESSOR OR OTHER CONTROLLED DEVICE THAT ALLOWS A PLAYER OR PLAYERS TO PLAY GAMES OF CHANCE, WHETHER OR NOT THE OUTCOME IS ALSO AFFECTED, IN WHOLE OR IN PART, BY SKILL, IN WHICH THE DEVICE MAY ACCEPT COINS, TOKENS, BILLS, COUPONS, TICKET VOUCHERS, SMART CARDS, ELECTRONIC IN-HOUSE ACCOUNTING SYSTEM, OR OTHER SIMILAR FORM OF CONSIDERATION AND, THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF CHANCE, SKILL, OR BOTH, ALLOWS THE PLAYER TO BECOME ENTITLED TO A PRIZE, WHICH MAY BE COLLECTED THROUGH THE DISPENSING OF COINS, TOKENS BILLS, COUPONS, TICKET VOUCHERS, SMART CARDS, ELECTRONIC IN-HOUSE ACCOUNTING SYSTEM, OR OTHER SIMILAR FORM OF VALUE.

(6) "GAMING EMPLOYEE" MEANS ONLY THOSE PERSONS EMPLOYED BY THE GAMING FACILITY OPERATOR DIRECTLY IN THE CONDUCT OF CLASS III GAMING ACTIVITIES, INCLUDING CAGE PERSONNEL, COUNTING ROOM PERSONNEL, BOXMEN, CASHIERS, CHANGE PERSONNEL, FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING PERSONNEL DIRECTLY INVOLVED IN THE RECORD KEEPING OR THE EXAMINATION OF RECORDS ASSOCIATED WITH REVENUE FROM GAMING ACTIVITIES, FLOORMEN, KENO RUNNERS, KENO WRITERS, MACHINE MECHANICS, ODDS MAKERS, SECURITY PERSONNEL, SURVEILLANCE PERSONNEL, SHIFT OF PIT BOSSES, SUPERVISORS OR MANAGERS OF THE CONDUCT OF GAMING ACTIVITIES, TICKET WRITERS, AND PERSONS WITH UNSUPERVISED ACCESS TO SECURE AREAS OF A GAMING FACILITY.

(7) "GAMING FACILITY" MEANS AND IS LIMITED TO THE AREAS WITHIN A BUILDING SPECIFIED IN WRITING BY THE INDIAN TRIBE AND THE SECURE AREAS OF THAT BUILDING.

(8) "GAMING FACILITY OPERATOR" MEANS AN INDIAN TRIBE, AN ENTERPRISE OWNED BY AN INDIAN TRIBE, OR SUCH OTHER ENTITY OF AN INDIAN TRIBE THAT AN INDIAN TRIBE MAY DESIGNATE BY WRITTEN NOTICE TO THE STATE AS THE WHOLLY-OWNED TRIBAL ENTITY HAVING FULL AUTHORITY AND RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE OPERATION AND MANAGEMENT OF CLASS III GAMING ACTIVITIES.

(9) "GAMING GOODS AND SERVICES" MEANS ANY GOODS OR SERVICES, EXCEPT FOR LEGAL SERVICES, PROVIDED TO AN INDIAN TRIBE IN CONNECTION WITH THE OPERATION OF CLASS III GAMING IN A GAMING FACILITY, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, EQUIPMENT OTHER THAN GAMING DEVICES, TRANSPORTATION, FOOD, LINENS, JANITORIAL SUPPLIES, MAINTENANCE, OR SECURITY SERVICES FOR THE GAMING FACILITY.

(10) "INDIAN RESERVATION" MEANS INDIAN LANDS AS DEFINED IN 25 UNITED STATES CODE SECTION 2703 (4) (A) AND (B), SUBJECT TO THE PROVISION OF 25 UNITED STATES CODE SECTION 2719.

(11) "INDIAN TRIBE" MEANS ANY FEDERALLY RECOGNIZED INDIAN TRIBE WITH A RESERVATION LOCATED WITHIN THE STATE.

(12) "SECURE AREAS" MEANS THE GAMING FACILITY SURVEILLANCE ROOM, ALL CASINO FINANCE AREAS, INCLUDING THE HARD COUNT ROOM, THE SOFT COUNT ROOM, THE COIN VAULT, THE MAIN VAULT, THE CHIP COUNT ROOM, THE CHIP OR VAULT STORAGE ROOM, AND ANY OTHER AREAS OF THE GAMING FACILITY DESIGNATED BY THE GOVERNING BODY OF AN INDIAN TRIBE.

(13) "STATE" MEANS THE STATE OF ARIZONA.

(14) "TABLE GAME" MEANS A HOUSE BANKED GAME OF CHANCE, SKILL, OR BOTH, CUSTOMARILY PLAYED IN CASINOS, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, CARD GAMES OF ANY KIND, ROULETTE, CRAPS AND BACCARAT.

SECTION 5. Title 5, Chapter 6, Article 1, Arizona Revised Statutes, is amended by adding Section 5-601.03 to read:

5-601.03. TRIBAL-STATE LICENSING CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS.

A. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER PROVISION OF LAW, EACH MANUFACTURER AND SUPPLIER OF GAMING DEVICES, AND EACH PERSON PROVIDING GAMING GOODS AND SERVICES IN AN AMOUNT IN EXCESS OF FIFTY THOUSAND DOLLARS IN ANY SINGLE MONTH, WITHIN OR WITHOUT THE GAMING FACILITY, SHALL BE LICENSED BY THE TRIBAL GAMING OFFICE AND SHALL BE CERTIFIED BY THE DEPARTMENT BEFORE THE SALE OR LEASE OF ANY GAMING DEVICES OR GAMING GOODS AND SERVICES. EACH INDIAN TRIBE ENTERING INTO A TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT PURSUANT TO � 5-601.02 SHALL ON A QUARTERLY BASIS, PROVIDE TO THE DEPARTMENT A LIST OF NAMES AND ADDRESSES OF ALL VENDORS PROVIDING GAMING DEVICES AND A SEPARATE LIST OF NAMES AND ADDRESSES OF ALL VENDORS PROVIDING GAMING GOODS AND SERVICES IN AN AMOUNT IN EXCESS OF FIFTY THOUSAND DOLLARS IN ANY SINGLE MONTH. THE STATE SHALL NOT BE ENTITLED TO CHARGE ANY MANUFACTURER OR SUPPLIER OF GAMING DEVICES OR PERSON PROVIDING GAMING GOODS AND SERVICES THAT IS LICENSED BY THE TRIBE ANY FEE FOR CERTIFICATION BY THE DEPARTMENT.

SECTION 6. Title 5, Chapter 6, Article 1, Arizona Revised Statutes, is amended by adding Section 5-601.04 to read:

5-601.04. ARIZONA COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS; APPLICATION; SELECTION; DISTRIBUTION OF FUNDS; ADOPTION OF RULES.

A. BEGINNING ON JANUARY 15, 2004, AND EVERY YEAR THEREAFTER THE ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SHALL MAKE APPLICATION FORMS, CREATED BY THE ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, FOR ARIZONA COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE AT ALL HIGH SCHOOLS IN THE STATE AND TO THE PUBLIC. ARIZONA COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS SHALL ONLY BE AWARDED TO RESIDENTS OF ARIZONA FOR USE AT A PUBLIC UNIVERSITY, COMMUNITY COLLEGE OR TRIBAL COLLEGE WITHIN THE STATE. OF THE MONIES RECEIVED BY THE ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR ARIZONA COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS FROM THE ARIZONA COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIP AND ELDERLY CARE FUND ESTABLISHED IN � 5-601.02 (H), SIXTY PER CENT OF THE MONIES SHALL BE USED FOR SCHOLARSHIPS TO ATTEND PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES IN THE STATE AND FORTY PER CENT OF THE MONIES SHALL BE USED FOR SCHOLARSHIPS TO ATTEND COMMUNITY COLLEGES OR TRIBAL COLLEGES IN THE STATE. THE AMOUNT OF EACH SCHOLARSHIP AWARDED PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION TO ATTEND A PUBLIC UNIVERSITY OR FOUR-YEAR TRIBAL COLLEGE IN THE STATE SHALL BE SUFFICIENT TO COVER THE COST OF TUITION FOR EACH SCHOOL YEAR UP TO A MAXIMUM OF FOUR SCHOOL YEARS PER AWARD RECIPIENT. THE AMOUNT OF EACH SCHOLARSHIP AWARDED PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION TO ATTEND A COMMUNITY COLLEGE OR TWO-YEAR TRIBAL COLLEGE IN THE STATE SHALL BE SUFFICIENT TO COVER THE COST OF TUITION FOR EACH SCHOOL YEAR UP TO A MAXIMUM OF TWO SCHOOL YEARS PER AWARD RECIPIENT.

B. FOR EACH YEAR BEGINNING IN 2004, THE ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SHALL DETERMINE THE NUMBER OF AVAILABLE SCHOLARSHIPS TO BE AWARDED FOR THAT SCHOOL YEAR.

C. FOR EACH YEAR BEGINNING IN 2004, THE ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SHALL NOTIFY BY FIRST CLASS MAIL EACH PERSON CHOSEN TO RECEIVE A SCHOLARSHIP PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION.

D. FOR EACH YEAR BEGINNING IN 2004, EACH SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENT SHALL SUBMIT TO THE ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION PROOF OF FULL-TIME ENROLLMENT FOR EACH SEMESTER IN AN ARIZONA UNIVERSITY, COMMUNITY COLLEGE OR TRIBAL COLLEGE. THE ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SHALL DETERMINE THE NECESSARY PROOF REQUIRED TO SATISFY THE REQUIREMENTS OF THIS SUBSECTION. IF AN AWARD RECIPIENT DOES NOT COMPLY WITH THE REQUIREMENTS OF THIS SUBSECTION, ANY MONIES ALLOCATED FOR THE PAYMENT OF TUITION FOR THAT AWARD RECIPIENT SHALL REVERT TO THE ARIZONA COLLEGE EDUCATION SCHOLARSHIP AND ELDERLY CARE FUND ESTABLISHED IN � 5-601.02(H) TO BE REALLOCATED AS PART OF ANOTHER SCHOLARSHIP PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION.

E. FOR EACH YEAR BEGINNING IN 2004, THE ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SHALL NOTIFY THE STATE TREASURER OF THE AMOUNT TO BE DISTRIBUTED TO EACH UNIVERSITY, COMMUNITY COLLEGE AND TRIBAL COLLEGE TO COVER THE COST OF TUITION SCHOLARSHIPS AWARDED FOR THAT SCHOOL YEAR. THE ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SHALL ALSO NOTIFY THE STATE TREASURER OF THE AMOUNT TO BE DISTRIBUTED FOR EXPENSES INCURRED TO COMPLY WITH THE REQUIREMENT OF THIS SECTION.

F. FOR EACH YEAR BEGINNING IN 2004, THE ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SHALL PROVIDE A LIST OF SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS FOR THAT SCHOOL YEAR TO EACH UNIVERSITY, COMMUNITY COLLEGE AND TRIBAL COLLEGE REGISTRATION OFFICE.

G. THE ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SHALL ADOPT RULES TO IMPLEMENT THE REQUIREMENTS OF THIS SECTION, INCLUDING RULES ESTABLISHING AWARD CRITERIA FOR SCHOLARSHIPS BASED ON AN APPLICANT'S MERIT OR FINANCIAL NEED AND ESTABLISH DEADLINES TO ENSURE THE TIMELY DISTRIBUTION OF SCHOLARSHIP MONIES. RULES ADOPTED BY THE ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SHALL BE CONSISTENT WITH THE PURPOSE OF PROVIDING SCHOLARSHIPS TO ARIZONA RESIDENTS TO ATTEND ARIZONA INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER LEARNING. FOR THE PURPOSES OF THIS SECTION, THE ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION IS EXEMPT FROM THE RULE MAKING REQUIREMENTS OF TITLE 41, CHAPTER 6.

SECTION 7. Title 5, Chapter 6, Article 1, Arizona Revised Statutes, is amended by adding Section 5-601.05 to read:

5-601.05. ARBITRATION OF GAMING RELATED DISPUTES; NOTICE; PROCESS.

A. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER PROVISION OF LAW, ALL DISPUTES, CLAIMS, QUESTIONS OR DISAGREEMENTS BETWEEN THE STATE AND AN INDIAN TRIBE ARISING UNDER THIS CHAPTER SHALL BE RESOLVED PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION.

B. EACH TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT ENTERED INTO BETWEEN THE STATE AND AN INDIAN TRIBE PURSUANT TO � 5-601.02 SHALL CONTAIN A PROVISION REQUIRING THAT ANY DISPUTE, CLAIM, QUESTION, OR DISAGREEMENT ARISING FROM OR RELATING TO THE TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT OR OTHER PROVISION OF THIS CHAPTER SHALL BE RESOLVED THROUGH GOOD FAITH NEGOTIATIONS BETWEEN INDIAN TRIBES AND THE STATE AND IF SUCH NEGOTIATIONS FAIL, THROUGH ARBITRATION. THE GOVERNOR SHALL REPRESENT THE STATE AS A PARTY TO ANY NEGOTIATION OR ARBITRATION HELD UNDER THIS SECTION.

C. ANY PARTY ASSERTING THAT A DISPUTE, CLAIM, QUESTION, OR DISAGREEMENT HAS ARISEN UNDER THE TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT OR THIS CHAPTER SHALL SERVE WRITTEN NOTICE ON THE OTHER PARTY IDENTIFYING THE SPECIFIC NATURE OF THE DISPUTE, CLAIM, QUESTION, OR DISAGREEMENT AND ITS FACTUAL BASIS. SERVICE OF THE NOTICE REQUIRED UNDER THIS SECTION SHALL BE MADE IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE ARIZONA RULES OF CIVIL PROCEDURE FOR SERVICE OF PROCESS OR BY REGISTERED OR CERTIFIED MAIL.

D. WITHIN THIRTY DAYS OF COMPLIANCE WITH THE NOTICE REQUIREMENTS IN SUBSECTION C OF THIS SECTION, THE PARTIES SHALL MEET AND ATTEMPT TO RESOLVE IN GOOD FAITH THE DISPUTE, CLAIM, QUESTION, OR DISAGREEMENT. IF GOOD FAITH NEGOTIATIONS DO NOT RESOLVE THE DISPUTE, CLAIM, QUESTION, OR DISAGREEMENT TO THE SATISFACTION OF EITHER PARTY, THE DISSATISFIED PARTY SHALL SERVE WRITTEN NOTICE STATING THE NATURE OF THE DISSATISFACTION ACCORDING TO THE REQUIREMENTS OF SUBSECTION C OF THIS SECTION ON THE OTHER PARTY AND ON THE COMMISSION ON INDIAN GAMING DISPUTES.

E. WITHIN THIRTY DAYS OF RECEIPT OF THE NOTICE PURSUANT TO SUBSECTION D OF THIS SECTION, THE COMMISSION ON INDIAN GAMING DISPUTES APPOINTED PURSUANT TO � 5-601.06 SHALL MEET TO APPOINT AN ARBITRATOR TO RESOLVE THE DISPUTE, QUESTION, CLAIM OR DISAGREEMENT. THE ARBITRATION SHALL BE GOVERNED ACCORDING TO RULES ESTABLISHED BY THE COMMISSION ON INDIAN GAMING DISPUTES.

F. UNLESS THE PARTIES AND THE ARBITRATOR OTHERWISE AGREE, WITHIN FIFTEEN DAYS OF APPOINTMENT PURSUANT TO SUBSECTION E OF THIS SECTION, THE ARBITRATOR SHALL MEET WITH THE PARTIES TO DETERMINE AN ARBITRATION SCHEDULE INCLUDING WHETHER AND TO WHAT EXTENT DISCOVERY IS REQUIRED. UPON CONCLUSION OF THE DISCOVERY PERIOD, IF ANY, ESTABLISHED BY THE ARBITRATOR, THE ARBITRATOR SHALL SCHEDULE AN ARBITRATION HEARING UNLESS THE PARTIES AGREE IN WRITING TO RESOLVE THE DISPUTE WITH WRITTEN SUBMISSIONS ONLY. ANY ARBITRATION UNDER THIS SECTION SHALL OCCUR AT A LOCATION AGREED TO BY THE PARTIES. IF THE PARTIES FAIL TO AGREE ON A LOCATION, THE ARBITRATOR SHALL SELECT THE LOCATION FOR THE ARBITRATION HEARING. THE ARBITRATOR SHALL RENDER A DECISION WITHIN TWENTY DAYS OF THE CONCLUSION OF THE ARBITRATION HEARING. UNLESS THE PARTIES AND THE ARBITRATOR OTHERWISE AGREE, THE WRITTEN AND SIGNED DECISION OF THE ARBITRATOR SHALL BE NONAPPEALABLE AND BINDING UPON THE PARTIES, AND JUDGMENT THEREON MAY BE CONFIRMED AND ENFORCED IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE DISTRICT OF ARIZONA IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES OR IN ANY TRIBAL COURT IN ACCORDANCE WITH APPLICABLE TRIBAL LAW.

G. AN INDIAN TRIBE ENTERING INTO A TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT AND THE STATE EACH WAIVES ITS SOVEREIGN IMMUNITY SOLELY FOR THE PURPOSE OF ALLOWING A BINDING ARBITRATION AS PROVIDED BY THIS SECTION TO PROCEED AND BE ENFORCED CONSISTENT WITH THE PROVISIONS OF THIS SECTION.

H. EACH PARTY SHALL PAY ITS OWN ATTORNEY FEES AND EXPENSES AND AN EQUAL SHARE OF THE COSTS OF ARBITRATION, EXCEPT AS OTHERWISE ORDERED BY THE ARBITRATOR.

I. FOR PURPOSES OF THIS SECTION, "PARTY" OR "PARTIES" MEANS THE GOVERNOR, AN INDIAN TRIBE, OR BOTH.

SECTION 8. Title 5, Chapter 6, Article 1, Arizona Revised Statutes, is amended by adding Section 5-601.06 to read:

5-601.06. COMMISSION ON INDIAN GAMING DISPUTES; POWERS AND DUTIES.

A. A COMMISSION ON INDIAN GAMING DISPUTES IS ESTABLISHED CONSISTING OF TWO MEMBERS APPOINTED BY THE GOVERNOR, TWO MEMBERS APPOINTED BY THE ATTORNEY GENERAL, AND FIVE MEMBERS APPOINTED BY THE GOVERNOR FROM A LIST OF INDIAN TRIBAL MEMBERS SUBMITTED TO THE GOVERNOR BY INDIAN TRIBAL LEADERS OF INDIAN TRIBES THAT HAVE ENTERED INTO A TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT PURSUANT TO SECTION 5-601.02. THE GOVERNOR SHALL MAKE THE APPOINTMENTS OF INDIAN TRIBAL MEMBERS AND THE APPOINTMENTS SHALL BE MADE SOLELY FROM THE LIST SUBMITTED BY THE INDIAN TRIBAL LEADERS NOT MORE THAN THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE GOVERNOR RECEIVES THE LIST OF TRIBAL MEMBERS SUBMITTED PURSUANT TO THIS SUBSECTION. ALL MEMBERS OF THE INITIAL COMMISSION ON INDIAN GAMING DISPUTES SHALL BE APPOINTED BY MARCH 1, 2003. COMMISSION MEMBERS SHALL VOTE FOR A COMMISSION CHAIRMAN.

B. MEMBERS OF THE COMMISSION SHALL SERVE FIVE-YEAR TERMS. IF A VACANCY OCCURS ON THE COMMISSION, A NEW COMMISSIONER SHALL BE APPOINTED WITHIN THIRTY DAYS OF THE VACANCY BY THE SAME APPOINTING OFFICER OR THEIR SUCCESSOR WHO MADE THE APPOINTMENT OF THE MEMBER WHOSE POSITION ON THE COMMISSION IS VACANT AND IN THE SAME MANNER AS THE VACANT COMMISSIONER'S APPOINTMENT WAS MADE.

C. THE COMMISSION SHALL MEET BY APRIL 1, 2003 TO SELECT A POOL OF AT LEAST FOUR QUALIFIED TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT DISPUTE ARBITRATORS. ARBITRATORS SELECTED UNDER THIS SECTION SHALL BE APPOINTED TO THREE-YEAR TERMS THAT MAY BE RENEWED BY THE COMMISSION. THE COMMISSION SHALL ESTABLISH QUALIFICATIONS FOR ARBITRATORS AND SOLICIT APPLICATIONS IN A MANNER REASONABLY CALCULATED TO ATTRACT QUALIFIED ARBITRATORS. AFTER THE APPOINTMENT OF THE INITIAL POOL OF ARBITRATORS PURSUANT TO THIS SUBSECTION, THE COMMISSION SHALL MEET WHENEVER THE COMMISSION CHAIRMAN DEEMS NECESSARY TO CARRY OUT THE PURPOSES OF THE COMMISSION.

D. BY JUNE 1, 2003, THE COMMISSION SHALL ESTABLISH ARBITRATION RULES THAT SHALL GOVERN ARBITRATION PROCEEDINGS CONDUCTED PURSUANT TO SECTION 5-601.05.

E. WITHIN TWENTY DAYS AFTER RECEIPT OF THE NOTICE PURSUANT TO SECTION 5-601.05(D), THAT AN ARBITRATION IS NECESSARY TO RESOLVE A DISPUTE, CLAIM, QUESTION OR DISAGREEMENT PURSUANT TO A TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT OR OTHERWISE UNDER THIS CHAPTER, THE COMMISSION SHALL MEET AND APPOINT AN ARBITRATOR TO PRESIDE OVER THE ARBITRATION. THE ARBITRATOR SHALL CONDUCT THE ARBITRATION IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE PROVISIONS OF � 5-601.05 AND THE RULES ESTABLISHED BY THE COMMISSION PURSUANT TO SUBSECTION D OF THIS SECTION. ARBITRATORS SELECTED PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION MAY CHARGE A REASONABLE FEE FOR CONDUCTING THE ARBITRATION THAT SHALL BE EVENLY DIVIDED AMONG THE PARTIES TO THE ARBITRATION, EXCEPT AS MAY OTHERWISE BE ORDERED BY THE ARBITRATOR.

F. COMMISSION MEMBERS ARE ELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE COMPENSATION IN THE AMOUNT OF ONE HUNDRED FIFTY DOLLARS FOR EACH DAY OF ACTUAL SERVICE IN THE BUSINESS OF THE COMMISSION. COMMISSION MEMBERS ARE ELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE COMPENSATION FOR ALL EXPENSES NECESSARILY AND PROPERLY INCURRED IN ATTENDING COMMISSION MEETINGS. THE COMPENSATION OF COMMISSION MEMBERS PURSUANT TO THIS SUBSECTION SHALL BE ANNUALLY INCREASED FROM AND AFTER JANUARY 1, 2003 BY THE PERCENTAGE CHANGE IN THE CONSUMER PRICE INDEX. IN THIS SUBSECTION, "CONSUMER PRICE INDEX" MEANS THE CONSUMER PRICE INDEX FOR ALL URBAN CONSUMERS, UNITED STATES CITY AVERAGE, THAT IS PUBLISHED BY THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR, BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

G. EXPENSES INCURRED BY THE COMMISSION TO PERFORM ITS DUTIES UNDER THIS SECTION AND � 5-601.05 SHALL BE PAID FROM THE TRIBAL-STATE COMPACT FUND PURSUANT TO � 5-601.02(J).

H. FOR PURPOSES OF THIS SECTION, "COMMISSION" MEANS THE COMMISSION ON INDIAN GAMING DISPUTES ESTABLISHED PURSUANT TO THIS SECTION.

SECTION 9. Title 13, Chapter 33, Arizona Revised Statutes, is amended by adding section 13-3302.01 to read:

13-3302.01. EXCLUSION FOR GAMBLING ON INDIAN RESERVATIONS; APPLICABILITY; GAMBLING AGE.

A. EXCEPT AS PROVIDED IN SUBSECTION B, THE PROVISIONS OF THIS CHAPTER SHALL NOT APPLY TO GAMBLING OCCURRING ON THE RESERVATION OF A FEDERALLY RECOGNIZED INDIAN TRIBE PURSUANT TO A TRIBAL-STATE GAMING COMPACT ENTERED INTO PURSUANT TO TITLE 5, CHAPTER 6.

B. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER PROVISION OF LAW, GAMBLING CONDUCTED BY A FEDERALLY RECOGNIZED INDIAN TRIBE THAT INCLUDES ALL FORMS OF CLASS I, CLASS II, AND CLASS III GAMING AS DEFINED IN 25 UNITED STATES CODE SECTION 2703, PARAGRAPHS (6), (7) AND (8) IN EFFECT AS OF THE EFFECTIVE DATE OF THIS ACT BY PERSONS TWENTY-ONE YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER SHALL BE LEGAL ON AN INDIAN RESERVATION OF A FEDERALLY RECOGNIZED INDIAN TRIBE IN THE STATE.

Section 10. Conflict with inconsistent statutes.

IF ANY PART OF THIS ACT CONFLICTS WITH ANY LAW OF THE STATE IN EFFECT AS OF NOVEMBER 1, 2002, THE PROVISIONS OF THIS ACT SHALL PREVAIL IN ALL PARTICULARS AS TO WHICH THERE IS A CONFLICT.

Section 11. Conflict with legislative referendum .

THE PROVISIONS OF THIS ACT ARE INTENDED TO CONFLICT WITH ANY REFERENDUM RELATING TO INDIAN GAMING REFERRED BY THE STATE LEGISLATURE FOR PLACEMENT ON THE NOVEMBER 5, 2002 GENERAL ELECTION STATEWIDE BALLOT AND THE PROVISIONS OF THIS ACT SHALL PREVAIL IN ALL PARTICULARS AS TO WHICH THERE IS A CONFLICT.

SECTION 12. Conflict with other ballot initiatives.

THE PROVISIONS OF THIS ACT ARE INTENDED TO CONFLICT WITH ANY OTHER INITIATIVE RELATING TO INDIAN GAMING ON THE NOVEMBER 5, 2002 GENERAL ELECTION STATEWIDE BALLOT AND THE PROVISIONS OF THIS ACT SHALL PREVAIL IN ALL PARTICULARS AS TO WHICH THERE IS A CONFLICT.

SECTION 13. Severability.

IF ANY PROVISION OF THIS ACT, OR PART THEREOF, IS FOR ANY REASON HELD TO BE INVALID OR UNCONSTITUTIONAL, THE REMAINING PROVISIONS SHALL NOT BE AFFECTED, BUT SHALL REMAIN IN FULL FORCE AND EFFECT, AND TO THIS END THE PROVISIONS OF THE ACT ARE SEVERABLE.

ANALYSIS BY LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL

Proposition 200 directs the Governor to enter into tribal gaming compacts allowing Indian tribes to operate slot machines and card and table games on tribal land. Tribes would contribute 3% of "annual net income" (defined as the annual total amount of money collected from Class III gaming, less any annual amounts paid out as prizes or paid for prizes awarded and annual labor and other operating expenses and annual interest expenses, depreciation and amortization) to the state to fund university, community college and tribal college scholarships, programs benefiting senior citizens, tribal education purposes and tribal elderly health care services. These distributions are outside the regular legislative process.

Arizona has entered into gaming compacts with 17 of the state's 21 Indian tribes. These compacts permit the tribes to operate specific gaming activities, including slot machines, that are, according to a federal court decision on appeal, illegal off of Indian reservations. These compacts begin to expire in the summer of 2003.

Proposition 200 directs the Governor to enter into a new gaming compact with each Indian tribe that requests it. All compacts must have the following provisions:

Term - 20 years. May be extended for an unlimited number of additional 20-year terms at the request of the tribe.

Facilities - Each tribe may operate 3 gaming facilities. The tribe and the Governor may agree to authorize additional facilities.

Games - Tribes may offer all forms of gambling legal under the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act including slot machines, card and table games including blackjack, poker, roulette, craps and baccarat, wagering on horse and dog races, lottery games, bingo and keno. Each tribe may operate 1000 slot machines or the number of machines that the tribe currently operates (whichever is greater) and may operate 20 gaming tables at each facility. Tribes may offer keno games at no more than 2 facilities unless the Governor and tribe agree on a greater number. The number of slot machines allowed increases each year based on changes in the state's population.

Transfer provisions - Tribes may transfer a portion or all of their slot machine allotments to other tribes.

Revenue - Each tribe must contribute 3% of the tribe's net income from gaming to the Arizona College Scholarship and Elderly Care Fund. Monies are distributed to universities, community colleges and tribal colleges for scholarships, to programs throughout the state that benefit senior citizens and to Indian tribes to be used for educational purposes and for elderly health care services. In addition, each tribe must pay an annual fee of $500 per slot machine to the state to reimburse the state for administrative costs incurred in relation to Indian gaming.

Disclosure - Each tribe's contribution to the Arizona College Scholarship and Elderly Care Fund is confidential, but the Arizona Department of Gaming may make public the aggregate contributions from all tribes. The Director of the Arizona Department of Gaming also must annually disclose the amount of money collected from the tribes as administrative costs.

Regulation - Gaming facility operators must keep surveillance logs that are open to inspection by the Arizona Department of Gaming. Tribes must investigate reported compact or tribal gaming ordinance violations and require gaming facility operators to correct violations. Tribes must notify the Arizona Department of Gaming within 48 hours when a violation is reported. Tribes must license gaming employees who are not enrolled tribal members. Tribes must also license each manufacturer and supplier of gaming devices and each person providing gaming goods and services in excess of $50,000 in any single month. The state must certify nonenrolled tribal members who are involved in gaming or financial activities, manufacturers and suppliers of gaming devices and persons providing gaming goods and services in excess of $50,000 in any single month. The tribal gaming office is authorized to conduct investigations of compact violations. The Department of Gaming has access to tribal gaming office reports.

Results of Statewide Expansion of Gambling - If state law changes to allow anyone other than Indian tribes to offer slot machines or card and table games for profit or if the state imposes any additional assessments related to gaming on Indian tribes, the tribes no longer have to make payments for regulatory costs or to the Arizona College Scholarship and Elderly Care Fund and the limitations on slot machines and card and table games become null and void.

Fiscal Impact Summary

Proposition 200 allows an increase in the number of slot machines at Indian casinos. Tribes that choose to participate would share 3% of net casino profits with the state. Several issues could affect the actual level of revenues generated by this proposition. It is difficult to predict in advance how these issues will affect the earnings per machine and the level of participation. The following fiscal estimates, therefore, represent potential maximum impacts, rather than a specific prediction of the ultimate outcome.

This proposition could possibly generate state government revenues of up to $32 million from the Indian tribes for specific purposes. The proposition could also possibly generate up to an additional $5.8 million in revenue to pay for state Indian gaming enforcement costs.

 

ARGUMENTS "FOR" PROPOSITION 200

Indian gaming has been a success in Arizona. It has provided Arizona's Indian Tribes the means to alleviate poverty and become economically self-sufficient. It has created thousands of good paying jobs for both Indians and non-Indians across the state. And it has given all Arizonans a new entertainment option.

But tribal gaming isn't a settled matter. Unless voters pass Proposition 200, gaming on Indian reservations will end when current Tribal-state gaming compacts expire. Voting Yes on Proposition 200 will keep Indian gaming alive in Arizona.

Proposition 200 does more than simply allow Indian gaming to continue. It shares the benefits of gaming with all Arizonans and not just the lucky few. Proposition 200 is superior to other gaming measures on the ballot because it:

More than 166,000 of your fellow Arizonans endorsed those goals by signing petitions to place Proposition 200 on the ballot. Proposition 200 strikes a fine balance between the needs of young and old, rural and urban, and Indians and non-Indians alike. Find out more at www.yesonprop200.com.

Please vote to continue Indian gaming in Arizona. Please Vote YES on Proposition 200.

Ray Bernal, Chairman, Yes for Arizona, Tucson

Dennis Patch, Member, Tribal Council, Colorado River Indian Tribes, Parker

Arizona's Indian Reservations are sovereign nations and as such should not have to ask the colonist's/occupier's/invader's permission to establish gambling casinos. The Tribes are asking for permission to expand and continue "gaming." Vote YES on 200 & 202!

Owners of dog & horse racing tracks seek permission to compete with Reservation casinos. Dog & horse racing is cruel to the animals. End dog & horse racing in Arizona: Vote NO on 201!

Bruce A. Friedemann, Candidate, State Representative, District 28, Tucson

Former Governor Raul Castro Supports Proposition 200

As a former governor of Arizona, I have seen a lot of policy initiatives come and go that promise to make our state a better place. Proposition 200 is one of those that I believe will deliver on that promise.

Proposition 200 would ensure that Arizona's Native American tribes can continue to experience the financial benefits of Indian gaming and work to improve the health care, housing and education on their reservations. It would also make a number of positive changes to Indian gaming so that it is better for the state as a whole.

Additionally, for the first time, funds from Indian gaming would be used for other purposes on a statewide basis. A new college scholarship fund for residents from throughout our state would be created, enabling thousands of people to enjoy the benefits of higher education. And funds would also be used to boost senior care efforts in our state - pumping millions of dollars in new revenue into a system that has been targeted for budget cuts over the past year.

It is not often that we, as voters, have such an opportunity to make our state a better place to live. By voting yes on Proposition 200, we can improve our educational system, provide better care for seniors and ensure that Native Americans can continue to benefit from Indian gaming.

All in all, I would say that's good public policy. I urge you to support Proposition 200 in the November 5th election.

Raul Castro, Former Governor of Arizona, Nogales

 

Pima Community College President Supports Proposition 200

The cost of education is often the main barrier between our young people and the dreams they aspire to achieve. If we can help lessen the cost, we make it possible for our children to do more and ensure ourselves a better future.

That's why I'm joining so many other Arizonans in supporting Proposition 200, the YES for Arizona! Indian Gaming initiative.

This important measure will provide more college scholarships for Arizona students than any other source in our state's history, making it possible for tens of thousands of students each year to better afford the cost of higher education.

This is a wonderful opportunity for our state to create a new source of revenue that will improve education in Arizona. And the initiative would also benefit our state by securing the future of Indian gaming and creating new revenue for senior care.

Proposition 200 is a creative and beneficial way to fund higher education in Arizona at a time when slower economic conditions make education funding even more scarce than usual. I strongly urge the voters of Arizona to support this measure and allow our children new opportunities in higher education.

Robert Jensen, Chancellor, Pima Community College, Tucson

 

Three of this year's propositions -- Propositions 200, 201 and 202 -- deal with Indian gaming. Of the three, Proposition 200 is the fairest and easiest to administer and deserves your vote.

As for fairness, Proposition 200 requires Indian tribes to (a) share 3% of net casino profits and (b) pay $500 per machine to the State for compact enforcement and gaming employee certification. Proposition 200 will make $32-$40 million available for full-tuition college scholarships for all Arizona students as well as for programs benefiting all Arizona senior citizens, tribal education and tribal elderly care and $10-$11 million for the State, twice what the State now receives.

By requiring Indian tribes to pay even more to the State, Propositions 201 and 202 will deprive tribes of vital revenues needed for health care, housing and education. While Proposition 200 requires tribes to share tens of millions of dollars, it does not redistribute income from our poorest citizens to the general population as Propositions 201 and 202 do.

Propositions 201 and 202 are reverse Robin Hood proposals designed to solve the State's short-term budget problems caused by tax preferences and the alternative fuels fiasco. At best, they are short-sighted; at worst, they are punitive.

As for ease of administration, Proposition 200 does not expand gaming to race tracks (as does Proposition 201) and does not distribute money to a dizzying array of bureaucratic programs without adequate oversight (as does Proposition 202). Proposition 200 is straightforward. The bulk of the money paid by tribes will go for scholarships - some 18,000 scholarships each year; the bulk of the remainder will go for programs for seniors.

If you believe that Indian gaming will help tribes become self-sufficient, I urge you to vote for Proposition 200 and against Propositions 201 and 202.

Paul F. Eckstein, Phoenix

FORMER PRESIDENT OF STATE LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS EXPRESSES SUPPORT FOR PROPOSITION 200

"I have been involved with politics for many years, including service as the President of the League of Women Voters. We worked very hard to inform the public about the issues and candidates, and what would be good for our state.

Therefore, I feel that I know good public policy when I see it. And I believe that Proposition 200 is good public policy.

This ballot initiative would improve gaming in Arizona in many ways, including raising the minimum gaming age and providing the opportunity for rural tribes to benefit in the same ways urban tribes have benefited from gaming. It also doubles the amount of revenue dedicated to regulation of gaming in our state.

But just as importantly, Proposition 200 represents the first time that revenues from Indian gaming would be used for statewide purposes. Specifically, this measure will generate tens of millions of dollars annually in college scholarships and additional millions of dollars each year for senior health care.

Proposition 200 is a carefully crafted measure that is the best balance for the state of Arizona, and it will have a positive effect on our state's quality of life. When we have the opportunity to improving an existing industry while creating new funding for important statewide causes, that is the kind of measure we should support.

Please remember to vote in the November elections, and please support the many benefits of Proposition 200.

Ann Eschinger, Past President, Arizona League of Women Voters, Phoenix

ASU Student Shows How Much Scholarships Can Make A Difference: Vote Yes On Proposition 200

I am very aware of the benefits that go along with having a scholarship. I was one of the fortunate students who received a Regents scholarship to a state school, in my case Arizona State University.

Without this scholarship, it would have been more difficult for me to have completed my education. My scholarship was awarded to me because of scholastic achievement and made me aware that I was going to college on my own merit.

I have seen my friends who, after completion of college, are overcome by debt and college loans. I was more fortunate, and if Proposition 200 passes, there will be many others like me who are able to start their working lives without such debt.

This initiative helps Arizona's future by providing 19,000 full-ride scholarships for Arizona students to apply for. The opportunity for 19,000 individuals each year to attend a college or university would not only alleviate financial burdens, but will produce a state with more young people who are ready to lead. It gives more opportunities for those that maybe never thought about going to college because of financial reasons. Now, they will have the opportunity to change their life.

I feel adamantly, as a resident of Arizona for 17 years and a product of the Arizona school system, that Proposition 200 is the right answer for Arizona citizens and for our future.

Vanessa Bucher, Tempe

 

STATEMENT OF STUDENT REGENT MEAKER: PROPOSITION 200

In the past year the university system has experienced record budget cuts -- another casualty of the national and statewide economic downturn. Although university presidents have been able to maintain a commitment to our system's teaching mission by preventing cuts to classroom instruction, our universities have still been severely impacted in areas such as building maintenance.

I wish I could say that this year's budget problem is only an aberration. Unfortunately, even during the good 1990's economic times, the state failed to adequately fund the university system and history shows the percentage decrease of state appropriations over time since the 1970's. During such times the universities must resort to the possibility of larger resident and non-resident tuition increases to compensate for these cuts.

Higher tuition without adequate, compensatory financial-aid runs counter to the state constitutional provision that public university instruction be made "as nearly free as possible." Our state's founding fathers conceived a public university system that would maximize access for its citizenry while maintaining high standards of scholarship and public service.

While the state should not limit its commitment to the public university system, I believe Proposition 200, the "Yes for Arizona" initiative, is a substantial step in the direction of keeping the doors of public higher education open to all Arizonans, especially poor and middle class students. This proposal would provide approximately 7,000 four-year tuition scholarships at current tuition rates, to Arizona residents, based on need and merit.

Although my opinion does not reflect that of the Board of Regents, I believe that the possibility of such a substantial amount of scholarship funding cannot be taken lightly. As the primary representative and voice of Arizona's public university students, on Election Day I urge you to consider a "yes" vote on Proposition 200, the "Yes for Arizona" initiative.

Matthew Meaker, Voting Student Regent, Arizona Board of Regents, Tucson

Assisted Living Facility Shows Support for Proposition 200's Positive Impact on Senior Care

As Executive Director for Scottsdale Village Square and President of Senior Management Resources, I'm writing today to show my support for Proposition 200, the exciting new ballot initiative coming in November 2002 that will greatly benefit senior care in Arizona.

Importantly for my industry, Proposition 200 would earmark 3 percent of Indian gaming profits in Arizona to elderly care and college scholarships. It's the only gaming measure that devotes so much to senior care.

Just this past year many seniors organized against a legislative attempt to cut elderly services by millions of dollars. This type of measure will help make those fights a thing of the past.

That's a dramatic financial impact for our residents and for our industry as a whole, and will help us help many of Arizona's seniors.

Proposition 200 would require the approval of Arizona voters. As a result, this new funding source for elderly care could not be tinkered with by the Arizona Legislature. The many millions of dollars per year that would be generated for elderly care is too great an opportunity to pass up for our residents.

I hope you will join me in supporting this important ballot initiative that could mean so much for elderly care in Arizona.

Colleen Sweet, Scottsdale

 

As a senior and Arizona resident of over 30 years, it's clear to me which of the gaming initiatives on the ballot is superior: we should vote Yes on Proposition 200 and No on Propositions 201 and 202.

Proposition 200 provides a significant and fair return of a share of casino profits to the Arizona citizens who have supported the development of Indian gaming. But unlike Proposition 201 and 202, it doesn't drain badly needed resources from the reservations that still are struggling to build their economic strength.

Proposition 200 is the only measure that remains faithful to the reason we approved Indian gaming in the first place -- building the economy of the reservations so that they can provide the homes, schools, hospitals and other community facilities most of the rest of us take for granted in our hometowns. That's a benefit for those of us who aren't Indians and who don't live on reservations because it will help build the tribes' financial independence and reduce the demand on our tax dollars.

Proposition 200 is particularly good for Arizona's growing population of seniors. Recent news stories revealed that Arizona is falling far short of the health-care facilities, workers and funding we'll need for all those seniors in the future. Proposition 200 would transfer millions of dollars directly into a special new health care fund to pay for the needs of senior Arizonans.

On the other hand, Proposition 202 will undermine tribes most by draining resources to the state and spreading the money meaninglessly through dozens of state government bureaucracies.

And Proposition 201 is a con game by race tracks to move slot machines off the reservations and into their facilities.

That makes the choice easy. Yes-No-No. Yes on 200, No on 201, No on 202.

Rose Ferber, Arizona Senior, Peoria

 

The economic outlook for most Indians on Arizona reservations remains bleak. High rates of unemployment and underemployment, poverty, poor housing and inadequate health care, contribute to a climate of hopelessness and despair that demoralizes and, ultimately, victimizes tribal members who lead quiet but desperate lives in the shadows of the prosperity and wealth of the surrounding non-Indian communities.

The Arizona Republic reported that the White Mountain Apache Tribe had a 60% unemployment rate prior to the Rodeo-Chediski wildfire which has fractured, if not wholly decimated the Tribe's fragile economic infrastructure. When Tribal governments cannot meet the needs of their members, this responsibility is often shifted to State government through tribal members' increased use and greater dependence on Arizona's social welfare programs.

Proposition 200 is the only gaming initiative which plainly recognizes that there is still much work to be done before Tribes can achieve true self-sufficiency. Although Proposition 200 shares the benefits of Indian gaming with all Arizonans by creating over 18,000 college scholarships and providing millions of dollars for senior health care, it does so without losing sight of the reason Arizonans have consistently supported Indian gaming, " it gives Tribal governments the economic means to build a better future for their people!"

Help us to continue to build that brighter future, vote"Yes" on Proposition 200.

Dennis Patch, Council Member, Parker

 

Proposition 200 Benefits Seniors, All of Arizona

I am a senior citizen living in the Tucson area, and I am in favor of Proposition 200 on the November ballot.

Indian gaming has been good for Arizona's tribes and has provided a form of entertainment for tourists and residents. I support continuing it into the future, and Proposition 200 would secure its future for 20 years.

Additionally, the proposition would create new funds for senior care that do not currently exist. Part of the profits from Indian gaming would be used, generating millions of dollars annually for our state for this very important purpose.

The measure is the best way to ensure that the future of gaming in Arizona is protected and that residents throughout our state can continue to benefit. I encourage all Arizona residents, especially senior citizens, to vote yes on Proposition 200.

Andy Haber, Tucson

 

PROPOSITION 200 WOULD GREATLY BENEFIT SENIOR CARE

Last year, the Arizona Legislature considered cutting more than $3 million from senior care programs. Fortunately, they decided against it, but considering the budget crisis our state is in, those cuts could resurface again in the future.

Such cuts would be a devastating blow to senior care in Arizona, making it more and more difficult to provide our elders with the kind of medical care and living facilities they need and deserve.

And they would have come at a time when Medicare is undergoing serious changes and challenges in the process of trying to serve our seniors. This could have created a one-two punch that would have seriously damaged senior care in our state.

Proposition 200 would help insulate our state against the possibility of such cuts in the future. It would create millions of dollars each year for senior care, which would make such care more accessible and better for those we care about the most.

Our facility, along with many others in Arizona, endorse Proposition 200 for this reason and many others. In these economic times, it's important that we look for innovative ways to solve problems. Using revenue from Indian gaming for senior care is one example of just that.

I hope you will support Arizona's seniors by voting "Yes" on Proposition 200. It will go a long way toward ensuring better care in the future for some of those we love the most.

Lynne Davis, Administrator, Sierra Winds Lifecare Retirement Community, Peoria

COLORADO RIVER INDIAN TRIBES FIRE DEPARTMENT SUPPORTS PROP. 200

The Colorado River Indian Tribes Fire Department plays and important role in emergency services for the Town of Parker and the reservation. We work side by side with the Parker firefighters to provide our citizens with the best public safety team in the County.

We operate on a relatively small budget, sometimes stretching our resources very thin. But now, we have the opportunity to provide our residents with crucial improvements in public safety with Proposition 200, the new Native American gaming initiative. Proposition 200 will generate much-needed additional revenue for fire trucks, ambulances, personnel, and training, giving us the ability to preserve and protect the residents of our city with the most up to date technology available.

By growing our revenue base by expanding the tourism and gaming, we generate more operating revenue that can be used to accommodate the public safety needs of our community without asking for more tax dollars from our residents.

FIREFIGHTERS SUPPORT THIS WORTHY ECONOMIC INVESTMENT. WE URGE A "YES" ON PROP. 200

Terri L. Little, Fire Chief, Colorado River Indian Tribes, Parker

 

The benefits of Indian Gaming stretch far beyond the casino walls. As a farmer on the Colorado River Indian Reservation, I see the benefits of Indian gaming here in the community where I live. Since the opening of Blue Water Casino and Resort, the tribal farm has been able to expand and diversify the crops grown on their land. Not only do other growers and I benefit from joint venture opportunities with Crit Farms but our employees benefit as well. Adding new crops to our area creates additional opportunities for year round employment. These crops also help develop new markets for all of us farming on the reservation.

Gaming on the reservation has increased tourism to our area and that has created a need for more janitors, dishwashers and housekeeping employees. Some of these new jobs have been filled by older farm workers who can no longer take the long hours in the hot sun and yet are still able to do these jobs and continue to provide income for their families.

Recently, the Colorado River Indian Tribes sent truckloads of alfalfa to the drought stricken ranchers on the Navajo Nation. This was hay produced on their tribal farm and donated to the ranchers for their livestock. In years past the tribe's dependence on agricultural revenue would have made this kind gesture more difficult. Gaming revenues have allowed this tribe to diversify and make their fate less dependent on agriculture.

Indian gaming does make life better on reservations and throughout Arizona.

Please vote "Yes" on Proposition 200.

Rosario Hurtado, Parker

As a long-time farmer and resident of the Colorado River Indian Reservation, I have seen the benefits of Indian gaming on the reservation. Revenue from Indian gaming has enabled the Colorado River Indian Tribes to build a new hospital and invest in infrastructure. The resort and casino have also boosted the local economy by generating additional tourism and jobs.

Continuing Indian gaming so the tribes are able to further develop their reservations is reason enough to support Proposition 200. However, Proposition 200 provides all Arizonans with direct benefits. Indian gaming profits will be shared with the people of Arizona and will provide some 18,000-college scholarships for tribal and non-tribal students across our state. Proposition 200 is the only Indian gaming measure that does this. As a parent of three, I support Proposition 200.

Please vote "Yes" on Proposition 200.

Herculano Casares, H&C Farms, Parker

 

My name is Francisco Diaz and I have been farming on the Colorado River Indian reservation for most of my life. In 1983 I leased a small parcel from the Colorado River Indian Tribes. Since then, I have been able to expand my farm operation, I now currently lease 4,000 acres from the tribes.

Farming has allowed me to adequately provide for my family. I have been able to send two of my children to Arizona State University and two are currently attending Phoenix College. As you know the cost of education continues to rise. I want to ensure that my grandchildren also continue their education in Arizona. Proposition 200 provides a sense of ease for me because it addresses this concern by providing approximately 18,000 scholarships to Arizonans.

Revenue from the tribal casino has enabled the tribe to provide additional social and health care services. Over the years my wife and I have seen this first hand through our work as foster parents to several local children.

As I age toward retirement, I am starting to realize the challenges senior citizens face. Proposition 200 addresses the concerns of seniors by providing money for senior programs including health care. As I near retirement it would be nice to know that our state has the resources to protect the seniors and children of Arizona through programs funded by Proposition 200.

As I write this letter I must keep in mind the difficulties that face our farming community. Farming is a risky business. Each year we face potential economic disaster from weather, insects, and volatile markets for our crops. Proposition 200 provides security for my family's future.

Please vote "Yes" on Proposition 200.

Francisco Diaz, D & D Farms, Parker

Adrian Diaz, D & D Farms, Parker

ECOLOGICAL PROGRAMS SPECIALIST URGES A YES ON PROP. 200

As the Project Administrator for the Colorado River Indian Tribes' Ahakhav Tribal Preserve, I witness, first hand, the many benefits derived from Indian gaming. The conservation and restoration efforts of the Preserve have also realized a greater sense of commitment through a stronger economic base, which is provided by Indian gaming.

Over the years, trees were cut down for steamboat fuel, dams prevented floods necessary for the continued growth of plants, germination of seeds, and suppression of non-native and invasive species, which have now replaced much of the native riparian vegetation. But in 1995, the Colorado River Indian Tribes established the Ahakhav Tribal Preserve to restore and protect a 1042-acre portion river corridor. In 2001 the tribes provided an additional 211 acres to the environmental conservation efforts of the Preserve, which brings the total acreage to approximately 1253. To date, over 30,000 native trees have been planted, approximately 250 acres of aquatic habitat has been restored and protected with plans to plant several thousand more trees over the next three years. In addition to the revegetation projects the Preserve supports an environmental education department, which conducts summer day camps and science education activities that include wildlife observation, habitat restoration, and canoeing.

Since the time of my grandparents' relocation from the Navajo Nation in the late 1940's we have never realized such opportunities for growth and development of all aspects throughout the reservation. I believe that gaming, in conjunction with traditional revenue streams, has provided us opportunities that otherwise would not have been possible. It is essential that we are afforded the ability to continue this advancement for past, present and future generations.

I urge all Arizonans to get out and vote YES on PROP 200.

Jon Villalobos, Ahakhav Tribal Preserve, Colorado River Indian Tribes, Parker

If voters don't pass an Indian gaming initiative in this election, all of Arizona will lose the progress that has come from tribal casinos. Indian gaming has begun to help many tribes work their way out of poverty and financial dependency. Tribes near big cities or recreation areas that have the ability to offer casino gaming have received a much-needed boost that has made it possible for them to build hospitals, schools, new housing, roads and business enterprises.

Proposition 200 will make sure all Arizona tribes have the same opportunity to become financially self-sufficient and less dependent on taxpayer support. Proposition 200 is the only gaming initiative on the ballot designed to give remote, rural tribes a real chance to share in the financial promise of tribal casinos by giving them a stake in gaming machines.

Now that they've had a chance to establish their gaming operations, it's time for tribes to share some of their profits with the rest of Arizona that has supported their efforts. Proposition 200 is the only initiative that pumps millions of dollars into new state funds to finance thousands of college scholarships and to expand elder health care programs.

It's important that we do not forget the original reason Arizonans approved Indian gaming a decade ago. Proposition 200 is focused on making life better for Arizona's Indians. And improving life on the reservations has major long-term benefits for all of us. That's why Proposition 200 is the only Indian gaming measure on the ballot that deserves the support of Arizona voters.

Rodney Glassman, Tucson Business Owner, Tucson

Navajo Expresses Support for Proposition 200

As a Navajo, my tribe does not allow Indian gaming on its reservation. It would be difficult even if we did because the Navajo Nation is in the far northern part of the state, a more isolated area than some of the other tribes.

I don't know if we are going to have Indian gaming in the future, but there are some things I do know. We don't have the advantage of being located near Phoenix or Tucson, so even if we do it won't be as successful as the Indian gaming facilities in those areas. I also know that we haven't enjoyed the advantages of Indian gaming, and still need better schools and health care and other services.

Proposition 200 would provide Navajos with a new opportunity to experience the benefits of Indian gaming if we choose to do so. The initiative would allow nations like the Navajos who do not have casinos or who are located in rural areas to lease their allocations of gaming machines to other tribes.

This would allow tribes like the Navajos to benefit from Indian gaming revenue for the first time, as well as making sure that Indian gaming is secure well into the future.

The college scholarships and new money for elder care would also help Navajos improve their quality of life. Elders are the most important part of Navajo families, and our children are the future of our Nation. Proposition 200 would help them both.

I'm voting "Yes" on Proposition 200 in November, and I hope you will do the same. It opens a lot of doors for Navajos and for the state of Arizona as a whole.

James Peshlakai, Cameron

 

Preserving Indian Gaming, Supporting Proposition 200 Will Help Arizona's Tourism Economy

My family owns a hotel near the Grand Canyon, in Tusayan. We're a small business that hires local employees and strives to make visitors to our state feel comfortable and enjoy their stay.

Over the past few years, we've seen the competition for tourism dollars grow more fierce, as places like Las Vegas spend millions of dollars to lure visitors away from Arizona. We need to preserve and protect our competitive advantage so that we don't lose this important source of economic impact.

Indian gaming has helped on this front. By providing yet another entertainment attraction for visitors to our state, Arizona's Indian gaming facilities have kept tourism dollars in state, making our local economies stronger and creating and protecting jobs for Arizona citizens.

That's why I support Proposition 200 on the November ballot. This initiative would preserve gaming for 20 years- longer than the other proposed initiatives- and would provide voter protection so that the Legislature could not eliminate this important economic engine without a public vote.

There are many other benefits of this proposal, including the remarkable contribution Indian gaming has made to life on Indian reservations and the revenue this proposition would set aside for thousands of new college scholarships and improved elderly care programs.

Proposition 200 is sound public policy that will help Arizona compete for tourism dollars more effectively, and therefore help keep our economy stronger in difficult times. I urge you to vote "Yes" on this measure and protect the positive impact of Indian gaming in Arizona.

Clarinda Vail, Tusayan

 

Some of the best days of my life were spent in Parker, Arizona. It was there that I had so many cherished friends that were members of the Colorado River Tribes.

The Lafoons, the Booths, the Fishers, Harlan Scott, Lloyd Miller, Jasper Johns, and my real life hero, Peter Homer, and many others were all very special to me.

Those memories helped prompt me to join in the support of Proposition 200. However, there are other good reasons to support the Proposition.

The cost of education is often the main barrier between our young people and the dreams they aspire to achieve. If we can help lessen the cost, we make it possible for our children to do more and ensure ourselves a better future.

That is an important reason why I am joining so many other Arizonians in supporting Proposition 200, the YES for Arizona! Indian Gaming initiative.

This worthwhile measure will provide more college scholarships for Arizona students than any other source in our state's history, making it possible for tens of thousands of students each year to better afford the cost of higher education. Some of these scholarships will go to our native Americans in Arizona.

This is a wonderful opportunity for our state to create a new source of revenue that will improve education in Arizona. And the initiative would also benefit our state by securing the future of Indian gaming and creating new revenue for senior care.

Proposition 200 is a creative and beneficial way to help fund higher education in Arizona at a time when slower economic conditions make education funding even more scarce than usual. I strongly urge the voters of Arizona to support this measure and allow our children new opportunities in higher education.

S. Thomas Chandler, Tucson

 

Initiative Provides New Educational Opportunities for Arizona Students

I've been a teacher in Arizona for more than 20 years, and throughout that time, my goal has always been to ensure my students get the most out of their education.

I've watched as many of these students have gone on to community colleges or universities and done great things with their lives. But unfortunately, I've also seen students miss opportunities because the cost of higher education can be prohibitive.

Proposition 200, the YES For Arizona! Indian gaming initiative would make it easier for Arizona students to get a college degree by providing direct college scholarships for Arizona's children. The initiative seeks to secure and improve Indian gaming in Arizona, but perhaps more importantly, also designates a percentage of net gaming profits in Arizona for college scholarships.

These scholarships will go to students throughout Arizona who attend the state's community colleges or universities, and will create significant savings for these students on tuition and fees. Tens of millions of dollars annually will be earmarked for our children so that they can get the education they deserve.

These scholarships will make higher education more accessible for Arizona's families, creating new opportunities for our youth that will improve their quality of life and make Arizona a better place to live. For someone who has worked for more than two decades to educate our children, the thought of making a college degree more attainable is something I enthusiastically support.

Sharon Jaeger-Ridenour, Scottsdale

 

PROP. 200 - THE BEST CHOICE FOR RURAL ARIZONA

With the passage of Indian Gaming legislation, tribal governments were delivered a unique economic development tool, specifically targeted to Native American Tribes.

The Colorado River Indian Tribes' rugged, individualistic nature emerged as they took control of their future. By embarking on a bold plan to independently design, build and manage a resort and casino on the Colorado River, CRIT emphatically accepted the challenge to help eradicate poverty from their Reservation. Parker, Arizona lies within the boundaries of the Colorado River Indian Reservation. The positive effects are appreciated area wide. Local people are empowered to make local decisions at the local level. This results in stronger relationships with neighbors, more work given to local contractors and service companies, and more support for community programs, both tribal and non-tribal.

The "ripple effect" of resort tourism and gaming touches most, if not all of the Parker business community. Indian gaming has expanded the customer base and aggregate discretionary spending levels that target local entrepreneurs. Indian gaming has been a positive addition to the Parker area's mix of amenities, helping to expand the local economy by drawing tourism dollars into La Paz County.

Rural communities face much different economic development challenges than do urban communities. I implore the State, and the voters to focus on cooperation and collaboration. Local decision-makers understand what benefits all of our residents - tribal and non-tribal. We all share the same needs, the same plans, and the same sense of community.

I fully support local dollars staying where they are most needed, in our local economy. Proposition 200, sponsored by CRIT, answers these issues with a plan to fund State health and education programs, without damaging Arizona's rural economy.

Jerry McGuire, Parker Area Businessperson, Parker

Native American Elder Witnesses Benefits of Indian Gaming

Growing up on the reservation, I lived a more traditional Indian life. We worked on the farm growing corn, lettuce, melons and other things we could sell at the markets. We depended on each other to provide for our families and our community. But for our people to thrive, we need to accommodate the changes that inevitably come with the passage of time.

Our children want to go to college. Our seniors need better medical care than we have accepted in the past. Our elders and our young families want better, yet affordable housing. And that is how the Tribe, through Indian gaming, has helped our people.

When our elders need repairs done to their homes, the Tribe has provided. When utility bills are no longer affordable, the Tribe has provided. When children cannot afford tuition, the Tribe has again provided. With the money from gaming, we now have a brand new Indian Health Center so we don't need to travel to receive good healthcare. We are able to serve lunch to hundreds of people everyday at our senior center. We are sending our children to college and bringing satellite university courses to the reservation. And we have built 100 new homes that our tribal members can afford.

Gaming has allowed the Tribe to provide the things that, in the past, we could only hope for. I urge Native Americans and non-Native Americans alike to vote Yes on Prop. 200 for our future.

Gertude Van Fleet, Mohave, Colorado River Indian Tribes, Parker

 

Rural Arizona Benefits from Indian Gaming, Proposition 200

I'm not from a community near an Indian gaming facility, but I still see how our state benefits from Indian gaming all the time. And I also see how we will all benefit from Proposition 200 and the YES For Arizona Indian Gaming Initiative.

Indian gaming has allowed tribes throughout the state of Arizona to provide better services for the people living on reservations. Many of these areas are rural areas not unlike Williams or other communities of this size. There's a need in place for health care, better schools and better infrastructure that would otherwise not be met.

Proposition 200 would secure the future of Indian gaming in Arizona, and allow these improvements to continue. And additionally, it would help rural Arizona and small communities throughout the state in two other important ways.

First, it would create new college scholarships for our children, making an education easier to obtain, no matter where in Arizona you are from. And second, it would create new revenue for senior care, meaning we can take better care of those who have dedicated their lives to taking care of us.

Proposition 200 is a great initiative for all the people of Arizona, and I'm pleased to lend my support. I hope you will join me in voting "Yes" in the November 2002 election.

Michael Vasquez, Williams City Council, Willams

 

PROP 200 WILL BE A LONG-RANGE ECONOMIC BOOST FOR RURAL TRIBES

Indian Gaming has provided a dedicated revenue stream to fund much-needed infrastructure on our lands, such as roads and sidewalks, water treatment facilities, homes for our elders, and school facilities for our children.

Gaming revenue has allowed us to provide scholarships to send our children to college and helped our tribal members open their own businesses. We've also built a new Indian Health Center and donated land for the City of Parker Hospital.

These improvements require careful study and long range planning. But right now, we are in jeopardy of losing Indian gaming. As our compacts with the state expire and our economic future is threatened, we cannot implement our economic development plans for our land and for our people. Our initiative, Proposition 200, will ensure that Indian gaming will continue into the future.

Proposition 200 not only ensures our own long-term economic security from gaming but it also shares the benefits of Indian gaming with all Arizonans. In fact, Tribes will contribute tens of millions of dollars every year to the state of Arizona for college scholarships and senior healthcare programs.

Proposition 200 provides the certainty we need to plan our capital investments, our program funding and infrastructure improvements -- making it possible for Arizona tribes to achieve their goals of self-sufficiency. And as tribes build their economic strength, those who live and work nearby will see the benefits, too.

We urge you to support Prop. 200. Together, we will build our future.

Linda Nez Bloxham, Navajo, Colorado River Indian Tribes, Parker

 

Proposition 200 Good for Arizona's Communities

As a City Councilman in the rapidly growing city of Glendale, I keep an eye on issues that will affect how we are able to provide for the people and families of the state of Arizona.

I'm supporting Proposition 200, the YES For Arizona! Indian Gaming initiative, because I believe it will help provide valuable services for all Arizonans while helping maintain the benefits of Indian gaming to the state's tribes.

Communities like Glendale have the opportunity to use their resources and tax revenues to create a better quality of life for their residents. Indian reservations didn't have that kind of luxury before Indian gaming came along. Now, reservations across the state are enjoying new hospitals and health care facilities, better schools and myriad other improvements because of this source of revenue.

Proposition 200 solidifies Indian gaming for the next 20 years, and at the same time, provides new benefits for Arizona residents. A percentage of the revenue generated by Indian gaming would be used for statewide college scholarships not just on the reservations, but for thousands of Arizona students. And revenue would also be used to pump money into senior care programs.

This initiative would improve the quality of life not only for Arizona's tribes, but for all of us. Please join me in voting "Yes" on Proposition 200 this November.

David Goulet, Glendale City Council, Glendale

 

BLUEWATER RESORT AND CASINO BOOSTS TOURISM THROUGHOUT LA PAZ COUNTY

Since it opened in the mid 1990s, The Blue Water Resort and Casino has been an economic engine for both the Town of Parker and the Colorado River Indian Tribes. The Resort has helped secure a competitive position for Parker as a destination for local and regional recreation and tourism.

Tourists generate hundreds of thousands of dollars in direct spending for local stores, restaurants, and recreational businesses. The presence of Indian gaming has helped boost existing events and recruit new ones.

Television coverage for our events reaches over 3 million households throughout Arizona and into California. Hotel rooms are booked solid throughout La Paz County and as far away as Blythe. This kind of exposure recruits new people to the area and keeps familiar faces coming back.

The impact of the Casino can be witnessed by the increase in the number of tourists flocking to the greater Parker area for boating, golf tournaments, concerts, and other local and regional events. Because a large percentage of those visiting are California residents, Indian gaming has actually imported direct spending, as well as tax dollars, into the local and county economy and having created a clear trickle down effect to just about every business in our community.

But the benefits go beyond just tourism. Gaming has created jobs. The Colorado River Indian Tribes have become the largest employer in La Paz County. It's clear that the success and economic vitality of the tribe and the Casino has had positive impact on the quality of life for the surrounding community.

The employees of our Resort hope you will say YES on Prop. 200 and keep our community working.

Dempsey Holt, Chemehuevi, Director of Marketing and Special Events, Bluewater Resort and Casino, Parker

Tucson Restaurant Owner Supports Proposition 200

My business depends on tourism, as do a lot of Tucson businesses. We've worked hard to make Tucson more of a tourist attraction and draw people in from outside southern Arizona.

Indian gaming has helped us do this by providing visitors with more to do when they visit the area. That means they stay longer, and spend more money in local businesses.

Of the measures being presented to voters on Indian gaming, Proposition 200 is the one that will do the best job of making sure this continues into the future.

Proposition 200 will secure the future of Indian gaming for 20 years or more. That in turn provides us with the knowledge that Indian gaming will continue to contribute to our tourism economy.

We need all the help we can get in competing with Las Vegas, Laughlin, California and other areas that target the same visitors we do. It will also help our state by providing college scholarships for our children and families and by creating new dollars for senior care, two important causes that deserve our support.

Proposition 202 does not secure the future of gaming for as long, and pumps money into bureaucracy after bureaucracy instead of earmarking it for important purposes. The plan, based on one crafted by the Governor, is not nearly as solid a solution for our state.

Proposition 200 is a great opportunity for our state to preserve part of our tourism economy and help our state's economy and families in a number of ways. I encourage you to vote "Yes" on this measure on the November 5th ballot.

Bob McMahon, Metro Restaurants, Tucson

 

ARGUMENTS "AGAINST" PROPOSITION 200

I oppose Proposition 200 and I hope you will join me in voting "NO" on this proposition.

Instead, I strongly urge you to vote "YES" on Proposition 202, the "17 Tribe" Initiative. Proposition 202 keeps casinos limited to Indian reservations and limits the number of casinos on reservations. It also provides for strong regulation of Indian casinos by both the State and tribes.

Voting "yes" on Proposition 202 ensures that no new casinos will be built in the Phoenix metropolitan area and only one in the Tucson area for at least 23 years. Proposition 202 keeps gaming on Indian Reservations and does not allow it to move into our neighborhoods.

Voting "yes" on Proposition 202 also allows poor rural tribes the option to transfer their gaming machines to tribes in urban areas thus giving these poor tribes millions of dollars in revenue for services they desperately need.

Voting "yes" on Proposition 202 will strengthen the State's regulatory role in Indian Casinos, insuring safe, clean operations.

Proposition 202 is the only Initiative on the ballot that will provide legally enforceable limits on class 2 "look alike" slot machines -- those that play like a regular slot machine but escape regulation because of a technicality. It is also the only Initiative on the ballot that has the support of the vast majority of Arizona Indian tribes.

Proposition 202 is the only alternative that limits gaming, offers fair revenue sharing and ensures strong regulation. Plain and simple, this is the best gaming proposal for all Arizona citizens.

Please vote "NO" on Proposition 200 and "YES" on Proposition 202.

Jane Dee Hull, Governor, Phoenix

Lost in the noise surrounding Indian reservation gambling is the issue of sovereignty. Arizona's sovereignty. Voters should first ask: when in the casino gambling debate have they heard any state official -- the governor, the attorney general or legislative leaders -- defend Arizona's constitutional rights and sovereignty? Then ask: how often have they heard them defer to "tribal sovereignty?"

The Tenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution forbids -- as violating state sovereignty -- federal laws which commandeer (in plain words, hijack) a state's legislative process to coerce the enactment of measures intended to enforce federal regulatory programs. A 1992 Supreme Court decision by Justice Sandra Day O'Connor confirms this.

However, the federal Indian Gaming Regulatory Act ("IGRA") does exactly this, coercing states to enter into "negotiations" for gambling "compacts" if "requested" by any Indian tribe within its borders. An invitation just to chat, it is not.

Moreover, the advertised goal of "confining" the gambling to reservations -- as if they weren't scattered across the state already -- is thin camouflage to mask continuation of a monopoly. Worse, Prop. 200 artificially sweetens the monopoly franchise with an offer to "share" a sliver of the revenues (to fund scholarships and elderly care, and who could oppose that?), but only if the monopoly is preserved.

Prop. 200 and the other "gaming" initiatives are expedient, after-the-fact attempts to justify past forms of unauthorized Indian casino gambling. They are efforts to perpetuate Indian gambling, forever immunize it from challenge and take the next step in the continuing saga of "tail-wag-the-dog" expansions of casino gambling throughout Arizona.

If voters enjoy being spoon-fed propaganda, glitzy ads and newspaper editorials designed to hypnotize them into participating in the piecemeal surrender of Arizona's sovereignty, they should vote for the propositions.

I will vote against all of them.

Ian A. Macpherson, Phoenix

 

Proposition 200 expands gambling. It would negatively impact Arizona families. Studies show that increased gambling causes significant increases in divorce, child abuse and neglect, and domestic violence.

Gambling increases divorce. Research shows a significant correlation between compulsive gambling and divorce. For example, 28 percent of Gamblers Anonymous members reported being separated or divorced as a direct result of their gambling. A nationwide survey of divorced adults found that 2 million identified their spouse's gambling as a significant factor in their divorce.

Gambling hurts children. The National Gambling Impact Study Commission found that "children of compulsive gamblers are often prone to suffer abuse, as well as neglect, as a result of parental problem or pathological gambling." A review of Indiana's state gaming commission records revealed that 72 children were found abandoned on casino premises during a 14-month period. In Louisiana and South Carolina, children died after being locked in hot cars several hours while their caretakers gambled. An Illinois mother suffocated her infant daughter in order to collect insurance money so that she could gamble. In Arizona, we have witnessed tragic cases of child abandonment while the parents gambled.

Gambling leads to domestic abuse. The National Research Council reports that between 25 and 50 percent of spouses of compulsive gamblers have been abused and domestic violence murders in at least 11 states have been traced to gambling since 1996. Mississippi domestic violence shelters reported increases between 100 and 300 percent in requests for assistance after the introduction of casinos on Mississippi's Gulf Coast. A University of Nebraska Medical Center study found that gambling is as much a risk factor for domestic abuse as alcohol abuse.

Gambling hurts children and families, and Proposition 200's expansion of gambling should be defeated.

Vote "no."

Gary McCaleb, Esq., Litigation Council, The Center for Arizona Policy, Scottsdale

Cathi Herrod, Esq., Director of Policy, The Center for Arizona Policy, Scottsdale

Dear Arizona Voter,

In November, the future of gaming in Arizona is in the hands of the voters. I am not an advocate of gaming, but I understand that it is probably not going away. As long as gaming continues in Arizona, it should be well regulated and provide benefits to the entire state. Neither Proposition 200 nor Proposition 202 has adequate gaming regulation and disclosure. They also fail in providing a fair amount of their revenue to the state. That is why everyone should vote NO on Proposition 200 and Proposition 202.

Both Proposition 200 and 202 do not require public disclosure. Full public disclosure is an essential part of making sure that the state gets a fair deal. Revenues and expenditures should be openly and accurately disclosed just like they are in other gaming businesses across the country.

In addition to not providing adequate regulation and disclosure, Proposition 200 and 202 fail to share a fair amount of their revenue with the state. Proposition 200 offers 3% of their net profits to the state. However, since Proposition 200 does not require them to disclose their revenue, the state wouldn't know how much revenue let alone how much profit they made. How would we know that we were getting the right amount?

A similar argument applies to Proposition 202. It offers a sliding scale of 1 to 8% of their revenues based on individual income. However, Proposition 202 prevents the state from seeing the individual reports that show income. Thus, there would be no way to make sure that each group was paying the right percentage.

Proposition 200 and 202 do not have adequate disclosure requirements and fail to provide enough revenue to the state. I urge everyone to vote NO.

Vote No on 200 and 201.

Senator Lori Daniels, Chandler

Dear Voters,

Three initiatives are being presented before the general public in the coming months. These three measures will undoubtedly change the way business is regarded in this State.

Presently, Indian gaming in the State of Arizona is unregulated to the extent that nobody knows how much goes in or comes out. There is no disclosure of revenues. This type of business practice is shady at least, and does not follow the standards every other business adheres to, not to mention it's a billion dollar cash monopoly.

I do not support the Tribes initiatives because they do not offer financial disclosure. The Tribes should not advocate hiding their money and they should not promote a shady monopoly.

Join me supporting disclosure. Vote no on both Tribal Initiatives, Prop. 200 and Prop. 202.

Beverly Soto, Phoenix

Dear Arizona voters,

I encourage everyone to evaluate the gaming proposals on the upcoming ballot. Regulation - Proposition 200 does not do this. Public disclosure - Proposition 200 doesn't disclose Tribal gaming revenues.

What about contributing to a general fund? They don't offer this. Only the Fair Gaming Act offers to apply upwards of 40% gaming revenues or $300 million a year to such programs as senior prescription drug, police and fire protection, and K-3 reading programs plus the State's general fund.

I believe voters should support a measure that benefits everyone, not a select proportion of people. Vote yes on the Fair Gaming Act.

Ann M. Caulkins-Ogg, Tonopah

Dear voters,

I am voting for the Fair Gaming Act, not Proposition 200 or the other gaming proposal. After reviewing all gaming proposals side by side, only the Fair Gaming Act offers an 8% share of gross revenue from Tribes and 40% of the revenue from gaming machines at the racetracks to the State. The other measures do not offer a fair balance of gaming revenue intake of Tribes, nor do they offer fair gaming to non-tribal sites. The Fair Gaming Act offers a Tribal-State compact for a limited ten-year time frame. Other measures propose compacts lasting greater than twenty years. This will only hurt the future of gaming. Let's expand positive revenue statewide, join me in voting yes on the Fair Gaming Act.

Jason Taylor, Phoenix

I urge Arizona voters to vote "no" on Proposition 200. It rolls back regulation, placing the public at risk.

We know from the history of places like Nevada that, without the checks and balances of solid, thorough regulation, casino operations can quickly fall prey to organized crime and other corrupt influences.

Proposition 200 is a misguided effort by its sponsor - the Colorado River Indian Tribes - to self-regulate its casinos. Proposition 200 seeks to eliminate effective regulation of tribal casino operations by state regulators. Proposition 200 is wrong and dangerous for Arizona.

Proposition 200 should not be confused with Proposition 202, which is sponsored by the 17 tribes that form the Arizona Indian Gaming Association. The 17 tribes worked and negotiated with Governor Hull's Office and the Arizona Department of Gaming to establish solid, enhanced regulation of tribal casinos. Proposition 202 provides for state, tribal and federal participation in regulating tribal gaming operations and in preventing casino crime.

Solid, tough regulation of gambling protects the public. Proposition 202 has it. Proposition 200 doesn't.

Please vote "no" on Proposition 200.

Stephen Hart, Director, Arizona Department of Gaming, Cave Creek

Sheriff Joe Arpaio Urges NO on Prop 200, NO on 201 and YES on 202

From a law enforcement perspective, CRIT's Single Tribe Initiative takes Indian gaming in the wrong direction. Under Prop 200, gaming regulation would be weakened while limits on gaming would be reduced. These provisions could open the door to less control on more high stakes gambling. That's a chance I don't want to take.

Prop 201, the Racetrack Casino Gambling Proposition, not only prohibits the Arizona Department of Gaming from regulating gaming at racetracks, it puts the racing commission in charge -- despite the fact that the commission has no experience regulating casino gambling. That makes no sense.

Prop 202, the 17-Tribe Indian Self-Reliance Initiative, offers a balanced approach to preserving the benefits of tribal gaming without sacrificing needed regulation. That is an approach I do support.

I hope you'll carefully consider these three propositions. After you do, I ask you to join me in voting NO on Prop 200 and 201 and YES on Prop 202.

Joe Arpaio, Sheriff, Maricopa County, Phoenix

 

Senior Citizens Oppose the CRIT Single Tribe Initiative

Proposition 200 is promoted as being good for Arizona seniors. But when you look beyond the smoke and mirrors, it's clear that these so-called benefits are just an illusion.

The fact is that 14% of the 3% of revenues from tribal casinos go to the Arizona Department of Health Services for programs that benefit seniors citizens. That's very little money to spread across a big state with a large senior population. That's why we oppose Prop 200, the CRIT Single Tribe Initiative.

Seniors across Arizona do support the preservation of limited Indian gaming and the good that it does for tribal members and all Arizonans. That's why we support Prop 202, the 17-Tribe Initiative, which offers a balanced approach that allows the tribes to continue to achieve self-reliance and allows all Arizonans to benefit from real revenue sharing.

Please join us in voting NO on Prop 200 and YES on Prop 202.

Patricia Carus, Board Member, Arizona Silver Haired Legislature, Williams

Patrick Lavin, Delegate, Arizona Silver Haired Legislature, Tucson

Marge McClanahan, Delegate, Arizona Silver Haired Legislature, Glendale

Robert B. Morehouse, President, Arizona State Senior Council, Senior Citizens Council of Maricopa County, Phoenix

School Teachers Oppose Prop 200, the CRIT Single Tribe Initiative

Proposition 200 is a single tribe proposal that singles out college scholarships and elderly health care as the only beneficiaries of continued Indian gaming in Arizona. Even then, the amount of money that will be shared is very limited.

As teachers, we certainly support efforts that strengthen educational opportunities. However, the CRIT Single Tribe Initiative offers very little to a very few. Prop 200 deserves a NO vote.

There is a way to support gaming on Indian lands and students throughout Arizona. Prop 202, the 17-Tribe Indian Self-Reliance Initiative, provides revenues directly to the Arizona Benefits Fund to reduce classroom size, prevent school dropouts and improve basic programs, such as reading. Prop 202 deserves a YES vote.

Linda Gaumer, Teacher, Rio Rico

Roseann Dugnas-Gonzalez, Teacher, Tucson

Jan Snyder, Teacher, Scottsdale

Sara Wilson, Teacher, Tempe

Prop 200 is a Losing Proposition for Local Communities

Two initiatives on the November 5 ballot are sponsored by Indian tribes. Prop 202 was developed and is supported by 17 tribes representing over 90% of all Indians living on reservations in Arizona. Prop 202 is a balanced approach that continues regulated gaming on Indian lands and provides revenues to support Indian self-reliance and community programs throughout Arizona.

In contrast, Prop 200 is a single tribe initiative that provides significantly less funding for local programs and less regulation of Indian gaming. That's a losing proposition.

We, the people of Arizona, can eliminate the double threat of reduced funding and regulation by voting NO on Prop 200, CRIT's Single Tribe Initiative. And, with our votes, we can preserve and strengthen the benefits of Indian gaming by voting YES on Prop 202, the 17-Tribe Indian Self-Reliance Initiative.

It is up to us, the voters, to make sure tribal gaming works for all Arizonans. Join us on Election Day in voting NO on 200 and YES on 202.

Jackie Baker, Council Member, Town of Camp Verde, Camp Verde

Ruben Jauregui, Mayor, City of Cottonwood, Cottonwood

Prop 200 is a Losing Proposition for Local Communities

Two initiatives on the November 5 ballot are sponsored by Indian tribes. Prop 202 was developed and is supported by 17 tribes representing over 90% of all Indians living on reservations in Arizona. Prop 202 is a balanced approach that continues regulated gaming on Indian lands and provides revenues to support Indian self-reliance and community programs throughout Arizona.

In contrast, Prop 200 is a single tribe initiative that provides significantly less funding for local programs and less regulation of Indian gaming. That's a losing proposition.

We, the people of Arizona, can eliminate the double threat of reduced funding and regulation by voting NO on Prop 200, CRIT's Single Tribe Initiative. And, with our votes, we can preserve and strengthen the benefits of Indian gaming by voting YES on Prop 202, the 17-Tribe Indian Self-Reliance Initiative.

It is up to us, the voters, to make sure tribal gaming works for all Arizonans. Join us on Election Day in voting NO on 200 and YES on 202.

B. Paul Barnes, President, Neighborhood Coalition of Greater Phoenix, Phoenix

Deborah Jefferson, President, Abel Acres Block Watch Association, Phoenix

Donna Neill, Director, N.A.I.L.E.M., Phoenix

 

There is a desperate need for economic development in Native American communities, and we have a record of promoting non-gaming enterprise on Indian land. However, gambling is not the solution to socio-economic problems and will ultimately be destructive and detrimental to Native Americans and Arizonans.

This debate is about whether we allow a dramatic increase in gambling in Arizona. Statistics demonstrate that wherever there is growth in gambling, organized crime seeks to corrupt the enterprise and dramatic increases in street crimes follow. Defeating Prop. 200 will not preclude Arizona from deciding on a reasonable gambling policy, we still can -- Prop. 200 is not reasonable.

The Arizona Republic recently reported that 67,000 retirees in Arizona are problem gamblers. Gamblers Anonymous chapters in the Phoenix area have increased from five to 21 in seven years. The National Gambling Impact Study Commission found that the rate of pathological gambling doubles within 50 miles of a casino.

Compulsive gambling is linked to the accessibility and acceptability of gambling in our community. Studies show that the number of compulsive gamblers will increase between 100-550 percent in areas with gambling. Gambling is the fastest growing teenage addiction.

Dramatic growth in crime accompanies the growth of gambling. The crime rate in gambling communities is nearly double the national average. Atlantic City's crime rate rose an incredible 258 percent within ten years of legalized casinos.

Known for his love of Native Americans, the late Senator Barry Goldwater understood the dangers of Indian gambling. In 1996, he said, "Gambling preys upon human frailty and greed -- a shabby means of economic boon for peoples of proud tradition and independent spirit....There are better means to economic development -- means which uplift the spirit and build foundations for the future."

We agree. Vote no on Prop. 200.

Jon Kyl, U.S. Senator, Phoenix

John Shadegg, U.S. Congressman, Phoenix

Jeff Flake, U.S. Congressman, Mesa

 

BALLOT FORMAT

 

PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION

OFFICIAL TITLE

AN ACT AMENDING TITLE 5, CHAPTER 6, ARIZONA REVISED STATUTES BY ADDING NEW SECTIONS 5-601.02, 5-601.03, 5-601.04, 5-601.05 AND 5-601.06; AMENDING TITLE 13, CHAPTER 33, ARIZONA REVISED STATUTES BY ADDING SECTION 13-3302.01; RELATING TO INDIAN GAMING.

DESCRIPTIVE TITLE

DIRECTS GOVERNOR TO APPROVE NEW TRIBAL GAMING COMPACTS; ALLOCATES EACH TRIBE 3 GAMING FACILITIES, 1000-1400 SLOT MACHINES, AND 20 GAMING TABLES PER FACILITY; 3% OF TRIBES' NET INCOME FUNDS STATEWIDE PROGRAMS SPECIFIED IN MEASURE.

 

 

A "yes" vote shall have the effect of directing the Governor to approve new tribal gaming compacts, allocating to each tribe 3 gaming facilities, 1000-1400 slot machines, and 20 gaming tables per facility; 3% of tribes' net income goes to fund programs for non-tribal and tribal community college and university scholarships and elderly health care services.

YES

A "no" vote shall have the effect of not authorizing the Governor to approve new tribal gaming compacts and not authorizing renewal of the current compacts when they expire.

NO

The Ballot Format displayed in HTML reflects only the text of the Ballot Proposition and does not reflect how it will appear on the General Election Ballot.
Spelling, grammar, and punctuation were reproduced as submitted in the "for" and "against" arguments.


BETSEY BAYLESS
Arizona Secretary of State
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� September 2002